The Art of Tapering

By Nancy McElwain, M.S., J.D.

With Ironman Louisville right in our own backyard, many athletes in the Louisville area are contemplating competing next year. Here are some specifics about tapering before the actual event. During a taper, physiological changes, such as increased blood volume, increased muscle glycogen storage, and enhanced tissue repair occur that aid performance on race day.  Although tapering for a sprint triathlon differs from tapering for an iron distance race, there are some basic principles that apply to the final weeks before key events.

When to begin?

The length of the taper depends on the length of the race and your fitness leading up to the taper.  As a general rule, the longer the race, the longer the taper.  I like to design tapers of 1 week for sprint distance, two weeks for a half iron distance, and three weeks for an iron distance event.  Some sources suggest as little as a two day taper, while others promote no less than 10 days.  Factors such as fitness leading into the taper, individual recovery characteristics, and relative tapering of the three sports come into play in further designing a triathlete’s taper.

Decrease Volume

The critical aspect of the taper is reducing volume by steps.  A good formula suggested by tri guru Joe Friel is to decrease volume about 20% each week for a three week taper.  For a 2 week taper, reduce volume about 30% each week.  For a week to ten day taper, reduce volume about 50%.  Resist the temptation to” get one last long one in” and it will pay off on race day.

Maintain Frequency

In reducing volume, cut back on the total number of training hours per week rather than the number of weekly workouts.  You want to continue to swim, bike, and run frequently but in lesser amounts so that you do not lose the “feel” of the sports.  The goal is for your neuromuscular system to stay sharp in performing all 3 sports while allowing rejuvenation to occur.

Maintain Intensity

Resist the urge to just “go easy” during your taper period.  Intensity is a key factor in retaining training induced adaptations during periods of reduced activity.  Studies have shown that eliminating intensity leads to lesser performances when compared to continuing with intensity training.  Of course, “intensity” is different for a sprint triathlon versus an iron distance event, so stick with race specific intensity.  The goal is to stimulate the energy systems you will be using during your goal event with intervals at race specific intensity.  You are not doing intervals to gain fitness at this point, but rather to “prime the pump” for full readiness on race day.

Individual Differences and Relative Swim, Bike and Run Tapering

An athlete with a greater fitness base may taper longer than an athlete with a lesser base.  If an athlete has not trained enough to stress physiological systems, tapering is not effective.  In addition, because recovery times for swimming, biking, and running differ, the three sports may be tapered at different rates.  Dr. Phil Skiba presented a study at the American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting concluding that a triathlete’s taper characteristics should be different for swimming, biking, and running.  In particular, swim volume may be maintained with positive effects closer to race day than run volume and with biking volume falling somewhere in between.

Gremlins

During a taper, many athletes begin to feel little aches and pains they have never felt before.  These “gremlins” appear out of thin air and cause mischief.  You may suddenly feel a pain in an elbow or feel uncomfortable on your bike.  For example, we notice that many athletes request our bike fitting services leading into events, with one athlete requesting a record five adjustments during a two week taper.  In final analysis, most of these gremlins are imagined, and not real physical ailments.

A Final Note – Be Kind to Others

As training volume decreases, you may become increasingly anxious and irritable as race day approaches.  Your pre-race jitters and irritability will likely be most noticeable to others.  Try to lighten up and be kind to those around you.  Remember that they have already put up with a lot to get you to this point of your training, and you want them to still like you enough to cheer you through to the end of the race!

Nancy has a masters degree in Exercise Physiology and is certified as a Level II by the United States Triathlon Association.  She owns Train Smart, LLC, a multisport coaching business that offers individual and group triathlon coaching, swim lessons and video stroke analysis, and bicycle fitting.  Nancy is a triathlon National Champion, All American, and World Long Course Triathlon Champion.  Her fastest Ironman finish was the 2005 Hawaii Ironman (10:59:44).  You may reach her at nancy@trainsmartmultisport.com or visit www.trainsmartmultisport.com.

Image from: www.Iamtri.com

Cream Cheesy Zucchini Spinach Penne

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

 Here’s a really easy recipe that your kids are sure to love. It’s creamy, cheesy and full of veggies.

 Nutritional Information Per Serving:  310 calories, 14 grams protein, 10 grams of fat,  43 grams of CHO,  5 grams of dietary fiber, 366 mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  20 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes

Serves: Six – 1  1/3 cups each

Ingredients

  • 8 oz  whole wheat penne pasta, uncooked*
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 zucchini, sliced
  • ½ lb sliced fresh mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or ¼ tsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp flour
  • ¼ tsp each: dried basil, oregano leaves and crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup fat-free reduced sodium chicken broth
  • 4 oz low fat cream cheese, cubed
  • 6 oz baby spinach leaves
  • ¼  cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 ½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese, divided

Instructions

Heat over to 375 degrees. Cook pasta according to directions.  Meanwhile, heat oil is a large skillet over medium heat.  Add zucchini, mushrooms, and garlic. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes while stirring often or until zucchini is crisp-tender.  Add flour and seasonings.  Cook and stir for 1 minute.  Stir in broth and cook while stirring for 2 to 3 minutes or until thickened.  Add cream cheese and cook and stir for 2 – 3 minutes or until melted.  Drain pasta and then return to pan.  Add zucchini miture, spinach, Parmesan cheese and ½ the mozzarella cheese.  Mix lightly.  Spoon into a 2-qt. casserole which was sprayed with cooking spray.  Top with the remaining mozzarella cheese. Bake for 10 minutes or until mozzarella cheese in melted.

Shopping List

  • 1  box (16 oz) Whole Wheat Pasta Penne
  • olive oil
  • 1 zucchini
  • fresh mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • dried basil
  • oregano leaves
  • crushed red pepper
  • fat-free reduced sodium chicken broth
  • low fat cream cheese
  • 6 oz baby spinach leaves
  • grated parmesan cheese
  • shredded mozzarella cheese

*You can substitute rigatoni pasta rather than use whole wheat pasta.

Image from: www.kraftfoods.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

Lose It® App Can Help You Lose Weight & Keep It Off

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

My son, Jon, told me about an app he found for his I Touch called Lose It!  Jon is a runner and very health conscious.  He is on a mission to ensure he’s maintaining a healthy lifestyle even though he works a lot of hours.  Jon is a radiology resident and is constantly faced with time management as well as making good food choices when he’s very busy.  He’s been very successful at controlling his weight even though he works lots of hours and also has to balance his time for his wife and three kids.

Jon has been so successful at maintaining his weight he has told a lot of his friends and family about the Lose It! program as well. My husband, Ordie, is currently using the Lose It! to help him maintain his weight as well.

As a dietitian, I have always encouraged my clients to keep food diaries but using this Lose It! App makes it incredibly easy for me and my clients as well. But the one drawback is that you have to have either an I Touch, I Phone or I Pad.

Lose It! is free app that you can download directly to your I Phone, I Touch or I Pad. If you don’t have a I-Phone it’s also available at www.loseit.com.

Getting Started

To start the Lose It! Process you need to get an accurate weight. Then you need to decide how many pounds you want to lose per week. The program then determines your daily calorie budget. The number of calories you burn at rest is estimated using a standard formula on height, weight, age and gender using the Mifflin equation. If you have had a resting metabolic rate using the Med Gem or Body Gem you can manually add this number of calories. You can adjust this daily calorie budget using the Adjustment field under the Daily Calorie Budget screen.  Next you begin to add your foods for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks. You can add custom foods that are not in the database and also add custom recipes as well.  In addition to you can add your specific nutrient preferences as well.

Exercise Calories

The exercise database is exceptional.  The calories burned are based on your individual weight.  It’s very interesting to scroll through the exercise to see how many calories can be burned for example I can burn 225 calories on an  elliptical for 30 minutes of exercise, burn 161 calories for hiking for 30 minutes, burn 225 calories running 30 minutes or burn 74 calories walking for 30 minutes.

Motivators

You can set up motivators to keep you on track.  These motivators include: reminders on your phone when you forget to log, daily or weekly emails that share your progress with others, and sharing your progress on Twitter and Facebook.  You can also add friends as motivators.  I am getting daily updates on my I Phone about how well my son, Jon, is doing with his commitment to exercise and eating healthfully.  This information tells me how many calories he ate, was he over or under and also how much he exercised.

Try Lose It! I think you will like it and find it useful in helping you to lose and maintain a weight loss, too!

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

 

 

Why Is Weight Loss So Hard…?

By Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD

How to lose weight is the number one reason athletes choose to make a nutrition appointment with me. They express frustration they “cannot do something as simple as lose a few pounds.” While few of my clients are obese, their frustrations match those of dieters in the general population.

At a conference presented by Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, and the Boston Nutrition Obesity Research Center (July 13-14, 2011), researchers addressed some of the issues that contribute to difficulty losing weight. Perhaps the following highlights might offer insights if you are among the many athletes who struggle with shedding some unwanted body fat.

 

Why gaining weight is easy

• To the detriment of our health, we are living in a food carnival. No wonder today’s kids enter adulthood 20 pounds heavier than in 1960! By the time kids are 4 to 5 years old, 60% of them have lost the ability to self-regulate food intake.

 

• Most people believe that obesity is a matter of will power, but it’s not that simple. For example, in obese people, the brain’s response to food odors and flavors is often blunted. Compared to lean people, they need more of a food to experience a positive brain response.

 

• When stressed, obese people (more so than their lean counterparts) seek high fat foods. Chips, ice cream, fries…

 

• Impulsivity, a genetic trait, is a risk factor for obesity. That is, obese people (more than their lean counterparts) tend to impulsively eat, let’s say, the whole plate of cookies.

 

• Food advertisements are designed to encourage impulsive consumption.

 

• Food advertisers know that marketing “works”—and kids who watch TV are a prime target. The average child sees an average of 13 food ads a day on TV; most of these foods are high in sugar, salt, and saturated fat.

 

• Research with children who watched TV with four ads for food ate 45% more Goldfish Crackers (100 calories more) when exposed to the ads for food as compared to when they watched four ads for games. The kids who liked the taste of Goldfish ate even more calories!

 

• Foods marketed with a character (such as Scooby-Doo) sell better. Fifty-two percent of pre-schoolers said the character-food tasted better (as opposed to 38% who said it tasted the same, and 10% who said food without the character tasted better).

 

• The standard supermarket diet is rich in sugar, saturated fat, and sodium. It causes obesity in rats. That is, rats fed standard rat chow maintained a normal weight. But rats fed a standard supermarket diet ended up overweight—until researchers took away that food. The rats then lost weight when they returned to eating rat chow. There’s little doubt that fats, sugar, and salt stimulate us to eat more than we need!

 

• When the calories are listed near a food, as is happening in many fast food restaurants, some people choose the foods with higher calories, believing it will be yummier. That response certainly negates the intention of the calorie campaign!

 

• People make an average of 200 food choices in a day; all these decisions can deplete our limited mental “resources” that govern self-regulation. That’s one reason why, at the end of a hectic day, you can more easily overeat. You lack the mental resources to say “no” to that tempting cookie…

 

• The food industry’s bottom line is always profits. When Pepsi started marketing more of its healthy products, sales of the unhealthy products dropped. The stockholders complained—and that puts the food industry in a bind.

 

Weight loss tactics: So what’s a hungry athlete to do???

Drugs are not the answer. For the past 20 years, no successful weight-loss drugs have been developed and none are in sight in the near future. Drugs that regulate appetite also impact many other regulatory centers and create undesired side effects. Hence, we need to learn how to manage the obesity problem at its roots—and that means prevent excessive fat gain in the first place, starting in childhood. Here are a few tips on how to do that.

 

• You can reduce your food intake by using your imagination. That is, if you imagine eating a food, let’s say, ice cream, you can end up eating less of it.

 

• Technology offers a glimmer of hope in the battle of the bulge. A free application for I-phones called Lose It! has created a thriving weight loss community, as measured by 7.5 million free app downloads since October 2010. The web version, www.LoseIt.com, is just as popular. LoseIt! members can conveniently and easily track their food and calorie intake.

 

• Lose It! includes a social network. Dieters seem to prefer online support from people they do not know, as opposed to involving their family and friends with their dieting progress (or lack there of). LoseIt!’s social groups are created according to goals. Dieters can easily (and anonymously) connect with and get support from others with similar goals. In fact, the best predictor of weight loss success with LoseIt! is having three or more Lose It! buddies.

 

NOTE FROM PUBLISHER: Barbara’s family members use this program to stay on track & they have been very effective at losing weight & keeping it off!

 

• Food advertisements are designed to trigger certain pleasure centers. (For example, McDonald’s is associated with happiness.) We now need to learn how to advertise healthy foods. The baby carrot campaign to “eat ‘em like junk food” has boosted sales 10%—including a new demand for baby carrots in school vending machines.

 

• We can change our brain circuits by substituting food with another stimuli, such as exercise. Exercise does more than burn calories to control weight; exercise changes the reward systems in the brain.

 

• Exercise supports self-control. That is, people who exercise have greater control over what they eat. They also have more control over sticking with their exercise program. Successful exercisers are able to make exercise a habit, and not a choice. Having one less decision to make bolsters their mental resources so they can cope better overall.

 

A final thought:

Somehow we need to change the perception that eating supermarket foods loaded with sugar, salt, and saturated fats gives us satisfaction. A few years ago, we changed the perception that smoking is satisfying. Parents stopped smoking when kids came home and said “Mom, Dad, please don’t smoke.” Today, we need kids to start saying “Mom, Dad, please don’t take me to McDonald’s.” Will that day ever come…?

Image from: www.topnews.in

  Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics) counsels both casual and competitive athletes. Her office is at Healthworks, the premier fitness center in Chestnut Hill MA (617-795-1875). Her Sports Nutrition Guidebook and food guides for new runners, marathoners, and soccer players offer additional information. They are available at www.nancyclarkrd.com. See also www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com.

 

Grilled Tri-Color Veggie Hummus Wrap

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N

Here’s an easy recipe that loaded with vegetables. Take advantage of the local Farmers Markets for lots of fresh vegetables.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  317 calories, 8 grams protein, 14 grams of fat,  43 grams of CHO, 7 grams of fiber, 480+ mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes

Serves:  2

 Ingredients

  • 1 medium zucchini, cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 medium yellow squash, cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 medium red bell pepper
  • 1 medium green bell pepper
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup shredded spinach leaves
  • 2 8-inch spinach or whole grain wraps/tortillas
  • 4 tbsp Sabra® Lemon Hummus or Roasted Garlic Hummus*

Instructions

Heat grill. Drizzle squash and peppers with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.  Grill veggies turning frequently until the outer skins of peppers are charred and squash is almost cooked throughout. Remove from the grill and allow to cool.  Peel roasted peppers and remove stem and seeds. Slice into strips. Slice grilled squash thinly on the diagonal. Spread each wrap with 2 tbsp of hummus. Sprinkle evenly with chopped spinach.  Divide grilled veggies in half and arrange evenly over the hummus and spinach.  Roll one end in and tuck both sides while rolling. Carefully squeeze as you roll to keep the shape. Secure with toothpicks. Slice in half on the diagonal.

Shopping List

  • 1 medium zucchini
  • 1 medium yellow squash
  • 1 medium red bell pepper
  • 1 medium green bell pepper
  • olive oil
  • spinach leaves
  • 8-inch spinach or whole grain wraps/tortillas
  • Sabra® Lemon Hummus or Roasted Garlic Hummus

*You can use homemade hummus or any type hummus that you like if you want.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

September is Full of Cycling Events

By Barbara Day

          If you are a recreational or competitive cyclist, September is definitely the month to be in the  Kentuckiana area.  There are four local bike tours where you are guaranteed to see the trees in spectacular full fall colors,  some of the most scenic countryside that Kentuckiana has to offer and experience the rolling hills while making some great friendships as you cruise along the countryside.  Two of the events, the Old Kentucky Home Tour and the Harvest Homecoming Bicycle Tour, are celebrating their 34th anniversaries.  The Bike Trek to Shakertown is a major fund raiser for the American Lung Association and the Bike to Beat Cancer is a fund raiser for the Norton Cancer Institute. The Bike Trek to Shakertown and the Bike to Beat Cancer have organized training rides to help get your ready for the bike tours.

Louisville Bicycle Club’s 29th Annual Old Kentucky Home Bicycle Tour

       The Annual Old Kentucky Home Bicycle Tour, (aka OKHT), is a two-day ride departing from E.P. Tom Sawyer Park in Louisville on Saturday, September 9th, with three mileage routes to historic Bardstown, Ky.  50-mile, 72-mile, and very challenging 102-mile century, which includes the legendary Pottershop Hill, and is the winner of the League of American Bicyclists Best Century 2000 award.  On Sunday, September 11th, there is also a 25 or 50-mile single-day loop that goes out to the famous Cookie Stop SAG and then returns to the ride start along with the 2-day riders. The Old Kentucky Home Tour is a beautiful bike tour through scenic, rolling hills in rural Kentucky, fully supported with fixed and roving sags. Price of registration includes bagels and coffee Saturday morning, Saturday lunch, Sunday morning breakfast, plus ample food and drink at the many SAG stops along the way. The OKHT tour is famous for the Cookie Stop on Sunday, where sampling the homemade cookies, of all kinds, is an endurance sport in itself. (All riders are invited and encouraged to bring cookies for the cookie stop). Sunday’s ride also features a post-ride pizza party at Sawyer Park. The fee is $45 for adults before August 21, and $40 for children.  The fee for the One Day Ride only is $30, before August 21, $35 thereafter.    For more information, visit the website at www.okht.org. 

Bike Trek to Shakertown 

The American Lung Association’s annual Bike Trek to Shakertown, sponsored by Kindred Healthcare, is on a roll with registration already well underway for the autumn bicycle tour, which is slated for September 17-19.  Considered a premier cycling event in Kentucky, the bike trek features spectacular countryside, historic landmarks, first-class service and a choice of routes for different ability levels. Routes are planned each day to accommodate the experienced rider, as well as the “neighborhood cyclist.”   To register for the trek, each rider pays a $65 registration fee and agrees to raise pledges to fight lung disease.  For more information about the Bike Trek to Shakertown, including pre-trek information programs and corporate teams, www.BikeTrektoShakertown.org. 

Elizabethtown Share the Road Bicycle Tour

For those in the Hardin County area, there is also the Elizabethtown Share the Road Bicycle Tour presented by the Central Kentucky Wheelmen.  It is on Saturday, September 17 with a 6-mile city ride, and countryside routes of 15, 35, 50, and 62 miles in length.  Registration money ($20 pre-registration, $30 the day of the event) is to raise funds to buy and install more Share the Road signs in the area.   For more information and to pre-register go to http://www.ckwheelman.org.

34th  Annual Harvest Homecoming Bicycle Tour

          The Annual Harvest Homecoming Bicycle Tour will be held on Sunday, September 25. This is a leisurely tour for the beginner, intermediate and experienced cyclist.  The routes vary from gently rolling to hilly.  The ride will begin and end at the ForestDiscoverCenteris Starlight, Indiana.  There will be a 5-mile, 25-mile ride, a 40-mile ride and a 65-mile ride.  The “World Famous Chris Cakes Pancake Breakfast” starts at 8:00 a.m. and Papa John’s Pizza for lunch.  Riders may begin riding after 9:30 a.m. T-shirts are optional.  Great SAG stops.  The entry fee is $20 before September 15 and then $30 for late registration.  The entry fee for children under 12 is $10 before September 15 $15 thereafter.    For more information contact the Clarksville Schwinn at 812.948.2453 or www.siwheelmen.org.

Bike to Beat Cancer  Pictured is GJ & Heather Hart who are the Co-Chairmen of Bike to Beat Cancer

The Bike to Beat Cancer, which benefits the Norton Cancer Institute,  will be held on Saturday, September 24.  You can choose from three distances – 35, 65 and 100 miles. The Bike to Beat Cancer begins and ends at E.P. “Tom” Sawyer State Park. Swag stops will be available along the way. Registration fee is $50. For more information, call 502.629.8046 or go to www.BiketoBeatCancer.org.

 

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

Implementing The Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act: By Improving Milk and Water Requirements in Schools

 

Presented by Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

With schools getting ready for the 2011-12 school year, changes have been made regarding water and milk requirements. Kids may not be getting enough fluid throughout the day so adding more access to water during school lunch.  In addition, the USDA has lowered the amount of fat and calories in the milk choice to include skim or 1% milk only. Flavored milk can still be offered but it must be either skim or 1% milk.

USDA  guidance on improving water and milk requirements to states on:

  1. Making water available during school lunch, and
  2. Offering a variety of milk consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Summary of Changes to the Water Availability during School Lunch Meal Service

  • Free water must be made readily available to children during lunch.
  • Schools are given flexibility in how to implement this change. The memo reads: “For example, schools can offer water pitchers and cups on lunch tables, a water fountain, or a faucet that allows students to fill their own bottles or cups with drinking water.”
  • Water is not considered part of the reimbursable meal. However, reasonable costs from providing water will be considered an allowable cost to the nonprofit food service account.

Summary of Changes to the Nutrition Requirements for Fluid Milk

  • Schools should offer children at least two choices of fluid milk that are either fat-free or low-fat (1 percent).
  • Schools may continue to offer plain or flavored milk as long as they are fat-free or low-fat until the new proposed school meals rule goes into effect.

Implementation

Even though local school districts have until the start of next school year (SY 2011-2012) to comply with the requirements, school officials and food service directors should start to make these changes now. Implementing these changes quickly is key to making the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act a success.

Advocates can support schools in this process by:

  • Working with school wellness councils to raise awareness of these new requirements and the timetable for making changes.
  • Collaborating with community stakeholders and the media to build awareness and excitement about these nutritional improvements.
  • Supporting  education and dialogue for school staff, students, and parents promoting the acceptance and understanding of the health benefits of lower-fat milk and the availability of water.
  • Connecting schools with best practice information on education materials, curriculum, and advice on lessons learned from the implementation of similar requirements.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

Kentuckiana Active Lifestyle Clubs

Clubs Website

Kentuckiana Single Hikers & Walkers                               www.kishaw.org

Louisville Hiking Club                                                            www.louisvillehikingclub.org

Swim Louisville Masters                                                         www.swimlouisville.com

Cherokee Road Runners                                                         www.cherokeeroadrunners

Iroquois Hill Runners                                                              www.iroquoishillrunners.org

Louisville Rowing Club                                                          www.louisvillerowingclub.org

Louisville Landsharks Triathlon Club                             www.louisville-landsharks.com

Louisville Bicycle Club                                                           www.louisvillebicycleclub.org

Ultimate Frisbee                                                                      www.louisvilleultimate.org

Southern Indiana Wheelmen                                              www.siwheelmen.org

Orienteering Louisville                                                           www.olou.org

Men’s Rugby Club                                                                     www.louisvillerugby.org

Women’s Rugby                                                                         www.louisvillewomensrugby.com

Louisville Lacrosse Club                                                         www.louisvillelacrosse.com

Louisville Fencing Center                                                       www.louisvillefencing.org

Sierra Club                                                                                     www.louisville.sierraclub.org

Viking Canoe Club                                                                      www.vikingcanoeclub.org

Louisville Canoe & Kayak Club                                              www.louisvilleareacanoeandkayak.org

Louis Masterbladers In-Line Skating Club                        www.masterbladers.com

Louisville Skating Academy                                                   www.skatelouisville.org

Louisville Square Dancing                                                        www.squaredanceky.com

Louisville Ballroom Dancing                                                   www.louisvilleballroom.org

Derby City Athletic Club                                                           www.derbycityac.com

Louisville Ski Club                                                                       www.louisvilleskiclub.org

Runners on a Mission (ROAM)                                              www.roaminlouisville.com

 

To add a club, send the name of the club and the club website information to info@KentuckianaHEALHwellness.com.

Image from: www.mattersofopinion.com

 

 

Should I buy 100 calorie packets to help me lose weight?

Should I buy 100 calorie packets to help me lose weight?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

When you are trying to lose or maintain weight, knowing how many calories you are eating each day is important. The 100-calorie packets are convenient but expensive. Many of these are junk food. Here’s some 100 calorie food suggestions for you: 29 pistachios, 12 Quaker® Quakes Cheddar Rice Snacks, 40 Rold Gold® Classic Pretzels Sticks, 1 hard boiled egg & 1 slice of Melba Toast, 2 cups of raspberries, 28 grapes, 1 cup blueberries, 45 steamed edamame, ½ red bell pepper dipped in 3 tablespoons of hummus, ½ cup low fat cottage cheese with 5 medium size strawberries, 60 Pepperidge Farm® Whole Wheat Goldfish Crackers, 1 Laughing Cow® Creamy Garlic & Herb Cheese Wedge plus 3 Triscuits®, ½ medium cantaloupe, 15 medium strawberries dipped in ¼ cup Cool Whip® Lite, 1 Healthy Choice® Mocha Fudge Swirl Bar, 1 Skinny Cow® Fat Free Fudge Bar, and 5 Nabisco® Nilla Wafers. Keep in mind, you can burn approximately 100 calories by running 10 minutes or walking about 20 minutes.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.

 

 

Chicken Broccoli in Whole Wheat Pita Pockets

Chicken Broccoli in Whole Wheat Pita Pockets

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

 

 

Nutritional Information Per Serving: 208 calories, 18 grams protein, 4 grams of fat, 25 grams of CHO, 3 grams of fiber, 422 mg sodium.

 

Preparation Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 5 minutes

 

Serves: 6

 

Ingredients

  • 1 can (10 ¾ ounces) Campbell’s® Healthy Request® Condense Cream of Chicken Soup
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice (bottled or fresh)
  • ¼ tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp. ground black pepper
  • 1 cup cooked broccoli flowerets
  • 1 medium carrot, shredded (about ½ cup)
  • 2 cups cubed cooked chicken or turkey breast
  • 3 whole wheat pita breads (6-inch), cut in half, forming 2 pockets

 

Instructions

Heat all the ingredients in a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat until the mixture is hot and bubbling. Spoon the chicken mixture into the pita pockets.

 

Shopping List

  • 1 can (10 ¾ ounces) Campbell’s® Healthy Request® Condense Cream of Chicken Soup
  • lemon juice
  • garlic powder
  • broccoli flowerets
  • 1 medium carrot
  • cooked chicken or turkey
  • whole wheat pita breads (6-inch)

 

Tip: This chicken mixture is also delicious served over hot baked potatoes.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.