Black Beanie Minestrone

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

This recipe has it all.  It’s high in protein, high in vitamins and minerals, has lots of phytochemicals, and it’s high in dietary fiber. You can serve this with homemade cornbread to round out the meal.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  341 calories, 13 grams protein, 16 grams of fat, 39 grams of CHO, 11 grams dietary fiber,  610 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 

Serves:  6

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled & diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 cup canned black beans, rinsed & drained
  • 1 cup canned light or dark kidney beans, rinsed & drained
  • 1 cup canned Great Northern beans, rinsed & drained
  • 8 cups of water
  • 1 cup Yukon Gold potatoes, diced
  • 2 medium zucchini, diced
  • 2 medium red tomatoes, diced or 1 cup canned diced tomatoes
  • 4 cups baby spinach, fresh or 2 cups frozen, thawed
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 6 tsp olive oil for drizzling on top
  • 6 tbsp Parmigiano-Reggiano, freshly grated

Instructions

In a large pot over medium heat, sauté oil and onions until they are tender about 10 minutes. Add carrots and cook for about 3 minutes. Add celery, beans, & water and cook for about 20 minutes.  Add diced potatoes & zucchini & cook for another 20 minutes. Add tomatoes & juices & cover and simmer for additional 30 minutes. Add spinach and pepper and cook for additional 3 minutes. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil over each serving with some grated Parmigiano-Reggiano.

Shopping List

  • olive oil
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 medium carrots
  • celery stalk
  • black beans
  • light or dark kidney beans
  • Great Northern beans
  • Yukon Gold potatoes or red skinned potatoes
  • 2 medium zucchini
  • 2 medium red tomatoes
  • baby spinach, fresh or frozen
  • Fresh Parmigiano-Reggiano

Image from: tamalapaku.blogspot.com/2011/06/minestrone-soup.html

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

What is Trigger Point Dry Needling and Can It Help Me?

By Janelle Ciolek, PT, DPT, OCS

Trigger Point Dry Needling (TDN) is a treatment technique utilized by specially trained Physical Therapists to help treat neurogenic and musculoskeletal pain of either chronic or acute nature.  Many people with pain conditions are found to have active Trigger Points (TPs) in muscles, which exacerbate their pain.  Trigger points are taut, banded, irritable spots within skeletal muscle that cause pain, especially when they are compressed.  In scientific studies, trigger points have been found to demonstrate irregular electrical activity and shortened muscle structure, along with having pain causing chemicals within the muscle tissue.  These trigger points will often cause pain referral to other adjacent areas.  For example, a trigger point on the back of the shoulder blade, when compressed, may reproduce pain in the front of the shoulder or down the arm.

During treatment with dry needling, the physical therapist inserts a flexible, thin filament needle directly into the painful trigger point. The patient can feel a variety of sensations, most notably a deep aching or cramping sensation, and often will experience a localized muscle “twitch” sensation.  These sensory experiences help guide the treatment and let the therapist know they are treating a problematic area.  Dry needling, through scientific research, has been shown to promote healing in the affected painful areas.  It does this by releasing muscle tension, quieting electrical activity in the trigger points, and decreasing the chemical factors in the trigger points that cause pain.

Trigger point dry needling, in the hands of the trained and capable physical therapist, can be used to treat almost any musculoskeletal condition, including back pain, whiplash, frozen shoulder, elbow tendonitis, and plantar fasciitis, amongst many others.  It can even be used post-surgically to treat hypertrophic or adhered scar tissue.  Dry needling is used as valuable part of the whole physical therapy “package” which can include therapeutic exercises, joint mobilization or manipulation, patient education, and modalities.  Every patient has a unique program developed specifically for them, based on their symptoms and needs.

The American Physical Therapy Association as well as the Kentucky Physical Therapy Association support the use of trigger point dry needling in the hands of trained and licensed physical therapist.  For more information, please visit www.kort.com.

Image from: www.dryneedlingcourse.com

Janelle Ciolek PT, DPT, OCS, is the Clinic Director and has been part of our KORT team since 2005. Janelle is a 2004 graduate of the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Bellarmine University, a Board-Certified Orthopedic Specialist (OCS), a certified  IASTM therapist, practitioner of Functional Dry Needling (FDN) and is a Clinical Instructor for the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). Janelle also serves as adjunct faculty in the Bellarmine University Physical Therapy Department. Janelle loves the fast-pace and challenges of outpatient orthopedic physical therapy and has substantial experience in this area. Her clinical interests include manual therapy, sports injuries, and knee and shoulder reconstruction.

 

Spinach Cheesy Lasagna

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s an easy-to-fix lasagna that can be fixed ahead & makes a great family meal. The time consuming part of this recipe is cooking the lasagna. The rest is just matter of adding prepared ingredients & baking.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  324 calories, 25 grams protein, 10 grams of fat,  36 grams of CHO, 4 grams dietary fiber, 928 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 20 minutes Cook: 30 minutes 

Serves:  8

Ingredients

  • 2 cups 1% reduced fat or fat free cottage cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 (10-ounce) packages frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained well
  • 2 ½ cups (20 oz) spaghetti sauce with mushrooms
  • 9 cooked lasagna noodles
  • 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • 6 tablespoons of grated reduced fat Parmesan cheese

Instructions

Combine first 2 ingredients in a medium bowl, mixing well then set aside. Spread 1/3 cup spaghetti sauce in the bottom of a 13X9X2-inch baking dish.  Place 3 noodles over the sauce then place 1/3 of spinach mixture, 1/3 of mozzarella cheese, 2 tbsp of Parmesan cheese.  Repeat with 1/3 spaghetti sauce, 3 noodles, 1/3 spinach mixture with 1/3 of mozzarella cheese, 2 tbsp of Parmesan cheese. Repeat but top with mozzarella cheese. Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 30 – 35 minutes or until heated thoroughly. Let stand 10 minutes before cutting.

 

Shopping List

  • 1% reduced fat or fat free cottage cheese
  • eggs
  • 2 (10-ounce) packages frozen chopped spinach
  • spaghetti sauce with mushrooms
  • lasagna noodles
  • 8 ounces shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
  • grated reduced fat Parmesan cheese

Image from: mnrecipes.com/hidden-spinach-lasagna/

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

 

Be Wise and Portion Size When Eating Out

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

 

The Affordable Care Law requires restaurants with 20 or more restaurants to put calories information on their menus or menu boards but what about small Mom & Pop local  restaurants? Here are some guidelines to help you make wise choices when eating out!

 

Strategies for Eating Out

  • Select a restaurant with care.
  • Develop an effective game plan.
  • Split menu items.
  • Ask for lunch size portions – they are smaller.

 

The consumer is in the driver’s seat.

  • Ask server to put salad dressing, butter, or sour cream on the side.
  • Ask the server to remove or don’t bring bread, butter, chips and salsa.
  • Order meat grilled or broiled rather than fried.
  • Hold the mayonnaise but bring on the mustard.
  • Eat whole wheat bread rather than a croissant.
  • Stay away from cream, cheese and butter sauces.
  • Order broth based soups rather than cream based soups.
  • Have the entrée split into 2 servings in the kitchen

Fast Food Hamburger Chain Green Light Choices

  • Single hamburger or cheeseburger
  • Grilled chicken sandwich
  • Grilled chicken salad
  • Baked potato with chili or broccoli
  • Small order French fries
  • Garden and side salad – use light dressing
  • Frozen yogurt

Mexican Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Black bean, tortilla soup or gazpacho
  • Mexican or taco salad (don’t eat the fried shell)
  • Arroz con pollo (chicken and rice)
  • Burritos and Enchiladas
  • Fajitas
  • Soft tacos
  • Black or pinto beans (not refried beans with cheese)
  • Mexican rice
  • Pico de gallo
  • All hot sauces

Chinese Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Wonton, egg drop or hot & sour soup
  • Teriyaki beef or chicken
  • Chop suey or chow mein
  • Vegetarian stir-fry dishes

Italian Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Marinated vegetable salad
  • Minestrone soup
  • Shrimp cocktail
  • Pasta with tomato sauce or marinara sauce
  • Chicken or veal cacciatore, light wine or light tomato sauce
  • Chicken or shrimp primavera (no cream in sauce)

American Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Broth-based soups
  • Chili (hold the cheese and sour cream)
  • Peel and eat shrimp
  • Salad with light or fat free dressing on the side
  • Salad with grilled tuna or chicken
  • Teriyaki or BBQ chicken breast
  • Fajitas

More Resources for Planning your Game Plan

A website, www.HealthyDiningFinder.com, can help you make better choices when eating out.

Eat This Not That: Thousands of Simple Food Swaps That Can Save You 10, 20, 30 Pounds-or-More

By David Zinczinko and Matt Goulding

$19.95

FREE app, Fooducate, for your I-phone or Android to help you make better fast food choices.

Image from: http://proverbs4wisdom

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

Alcohol, Athletes & Pressure to Drink

By Nancy Clark MS, RD

Ask any coach or college athletic director, and you’ll hear concern
about alcohol and athletes. Rightfully so. Alcohol and athletics is a
dangerous duo, associated with negative consequences including
hangovers, nausea and vomiting, poor grades in school, fights,
arguments, memory loss, driving under the influence, and trouble with
the law—to say nothing of injuries. Yet, tailgating before football
games, quenching thirst at the pub after a team workout, and celebrating
victories with champaign is perceived as the norm.
College athletes are more likely to drink than non-athletes. Serious
recreational runners drink more than their sedentary counterparts.
Unfortunately, alcohol is a highly addictive substance and is the most
abused drug in the United States, more so than steroids. Prolonged
drinking can damage the liver, heart, and brain, and result in
cirrhosis, pancreatitis, irregular heart beats, stroke, and
malnutrition. More oral cancer is seen among those who are just moderate
drinkers as compared to abstainers.

What can be done about this problem?
To address the problem of alcohol abuse among student-athletes, many
college campuses are educating students about social norms—the beliefs
about what is normal and expected in social situations. For example,
despite popular belief, “everyone” does not drink nor do “most students”
get drunk all the time.
A 1999 survey at Southern Methodist University asked these four
questions to students on a Friday about alcohol use on the previous night:
Did you drink last night?
Did you get drunk last night?
What percentage of SMU students do you think drank last night?
What percentage of SMU students do you think got drunk last night?

The answers showed major misperceptions about alcohol norms:
-Only 20% of students surveyed reported drinking the previous night, yet
they believed that over half drank.
-Only 8% reported getting drunk, yet they believed at least one-third
got drunk.
-Of students who drank, most reported consuming only a few drinks per
week. Yet they believed most students were drinking 10 to 15 drinks per
week.
-35% reported abstaining from alcohol, but very few believed that many
of their peers were non-drinkers.
(http://smu.edu/healthcenter/alcoholeducation/adp_socialnorms.asp.)

With ongoing social norm education, students will actually change their
drinking practices. For example, a three-year social-norm education
program targeted Division III athletes in a NY State college. It
contributed to a 30% drop in both excessive alcohol consumption and the
negative consequences of drinking. Among student-athletes with the
highest exposure to the program, personal alcohol misuse dropped 50%.
(1) Given that athletes are often role models, this change can have a
positive impact on the entire campus and potentially (eventually) our
entire sports society.

Minimizing negative consequences
If you are among the athletes who chooses to drink large amounts of
alcohol, take note:
• Alcohol is a depressant. Apart from killing pain, it offers no edge
for athletes. You can’t be sharp, quick, and drunk. Pre-competition
alcohol has a deleterious effect on reaction time, accuracy, balance,
eye-hand coordination and endurance. It will not help you exercise
faster, stronger, longer.
• Late night partying that contributes to sleep deprivation before the
next morning’s event hurts performance.
• Alcohol is a poor source of carbohydrates. You can get loaded with
beer, but your muscles will not get carbo-loaded. A 12-ounce can of beer
has only 14 grams of carbs, as compared to 40 grams in a can of soft
drink. Eat pretzels, thick-crust pizza or other carbs along with the beer.
• Alcohol on an empty stomach can quickly lead to a drunken stupor. Be
wise; enjoy the natural high of exercise rather than get brought down by
a few post-exercise beers.
• Alcohol has a diuretic effect–the more you drink, the more fluids you
lose. This is bad for recovery and the next exercise bout. While
low-alcohol beer allows for proper rehydration, regular beer sends
athletes running to the bathroom. One study showed that athletes who
drank beer eliminated about 16 ounces more urine (over the course of 4
hours) than those who drink low-alcohol (2%) beer or alcohol-free beer. (2)
• Your liver breaks down alcohol at a fixed rate (~1 can beer or 4
ounces wine per hour). Exercise does not hasten the process, nor does
coffee. Caffeine just makes you a wide-awake drunk.
• Drinks that contain congeners—whiskey, cognac, and red wine—are more
likely to cause hangovers than other alcoholic beverages. The best
hangover remedy is to not drink excessively in the first place. But if
you have a hangover, drink a salted beverage with carbs, such as
Gatorade or brothy chicken noodle soup.
• The calories in alcohol are easily fattening. People who drink
moderately tend to consume alcohol calories on top of their regular
caloric intake. These excess calories promote body fat accumulation.
• Alcohol stimulates the appetite, making it harder to feel full. If you
are trying to maintain a lean machine, abstaining is preferable to
imbibing.

The good news
Alcohol in moderation can have health benefits. Red wine, for example,
contains health-protective phytochemicals that may reduce the risk of
heart disease. What’s “moderation”?—two drinks per day for men, and one
for women. And have at least one glass of non-alcoholic beverage for
every drink…

Image from: www.lifehacker.com

Nancy Clark MS, RD counsels casual exercisers and competitive athletes
at Healthworks, the premier fitness center in Chestnut Hill, MA
(617-383-6100). Her NEW 2008 Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook
4th Edition, and her Food Guide for Marathoners and Cyclist’s Food Guide
are available via www.nancyclarkrd.com.

References
1. Perkins H and Crais D. 2006. A Successful Social Norms Campaign to
Rreduce Alcohol Misuse Among Collge Student-Athlets. J. Stud Alcohol
67:880-889.

2. Sherriffs, S., and R. Maughan. 1997. Restoration of fluid balance
after exercise-induced dehydration: Effects of alcohol consumption. J
Appl Physiol 83(40):1152-1158.

How Many Calories Do You Need Each Day?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

There’s an App for this!

Knowing how many calories you need each day will help keep you energized while you are training for your event and doing all the things you need to do each day: work, manage a family, take care our your home or lose weight.  There are some FREE apps that you can use to help to determine how many calories you need each day.

A FREE app, My Fitness Pal, for your smart phone or online at can help to determine how many calories you need each day: www.myfitnesspal.com/tools/bmr-calculator and how many calories you burn when playing soccer or lifting weights: www.myfitnesspal.com/exercise/lookup. Add the calories plus the calories you burned practicing to get how many calories you need on most days.

Once you determine how many calories you need each day, the timing of your food intake is also important. Eating 5 – 6 times per day will help give you bullets of energy but keeping the calories in line with your overall calorie needs will maximize your performance. Never skip breakfast.

Other excellent apps and websites to determine calories are: LOSE IT! (www.loseit.com), SPARK PEOPLE (www.sparkpeople.com).

The Old Fashion Way to Determine Your Calories

To determine how many calories you need each day, you can calculate the calories the OLD FASHION WAY by using the HARRIS BENEDICT EQUATION to determine your resting metabolic rate (RMR) then choosing an activity factor to estimate the total calories per day.

Harris Benedict Equation

MALE:

RMR = 88.362 + [1.889 X HT (in)] + [6.089 X WT (lbs)] – (5.677 X Age)

FEMALE:

RMR = 447.593 + [(1.219 X HT (in)] + [(4.20 X WT (lbs)] – (4.7 X Age)

HT = height in inches   WT = weight in pounds   age = age in years

Activity Levels

Very Light-seating and standing activities, driving, no regular exercise.

Light – child care, walking on a level surface 2.5 – 3 miles per hour, some regular exercise.

Moderate – walking/running 3.5 to 4 mph, cycling, regular exercise 3 to 4 times/week -30 to 40 minutes duration.

Heavy – walking uphill with a load, basketball, soccer, regular exercise 4 times/week 40 minutes or more in duration.

Very Heavy – distance running, hiking with backpack up and down hills, regular exercise 5 times/week for at least 1 hour in duration.

TABLE 1.  Activity Factors. Choose your activity level from the table below. Then do the math.

EXERCISE

FACTOR

Little to no exercise

RMR X 1.2

Light (1 – 3 days per week)

RMR X 1.375

Moderate exercise (3 -5 days/week)

RMR X 1.55

Heavy exercise (6-7 days/week)

RMR X 1.725

Very heavy (twice/day heavy workouts)

RMR X 1.9

Example, 1300 X 1.55 (moderate) = 2015 calories/day

You can also determine how many calories you burned by wearing a heart rate monitor that determines calories burned during exercise. (Not all heart rate monitors calculate calories). Then you can add those calories to your resting metabolic rate calories to get an estimate of active calories burned while exercising.  Example, 1300 X 500 calories = 1800 calories.  So, you could safely eat at least 1800 calories without gaining weight.

Again, it’s just an estimate. Weigh only once a week about the same time.  I suggest weigh after the first void in the morning before drinking anything with as few clothes as possible.

 Using Oxygen Consumption to Calculate your Personal RMR

The BodyGem Resting Metabolic Rate device is the handheld, portable and an effective tool that gives you an accurate RMR measurement result in 10 minutes or less. To perform a measurement, you simply breathe into the indirect calorimeter, which measures their oxygen consumption (VO2), the resulting RMR number is clearly displayed on the device’s LCD screen. It has been validated against the gold standard Douglas Bag, and other commonly used metabolic carts. The test costs anywhere from $75 to $150 per test. For the best results, you should take the test when you are fasted. But you still need to estimate the active calories you burn.

Body Media FIT™ On-Body Wellness Core Armband Monitor

The BodyMedia FIT CORE which is promoted by Biggest Loser is another way to determine how many calories you burn each day. The CORE’s biggest plus is that it track calories burned for 24/7. It cost about $119.  Unlike other fitness trackers, which estimate calories burned using an algorithm of steps and weight, the CORE uses special sensors to track not just your activity but also your body’s reaction to that activity. This makes it much more accurate as a calorie tracker, so you can realistically see how many calories you’re burning. But you have to buy subscription-based Activity Tracker in order to find out how many calories you have burned in the 24 hours.  The CORE Armband does not display any information on the device itself.  That will cost you  $6.95/month or you can opt to purchase a $69 optional display, which syncs with the CORE and lets you see a quick view of progress toward your daily goals. If you want to track your progress, you’ll still need to purchase the Activity Tracker.

What’s the Take Home Message?

I think it’s helpful to know how many calories you need each day so you can manage your health. In today’s world, lifestyle is the major contributor to increasing your risk of many diseases like heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cancer.  Lifestyle includes your diet and also your daily activity.

Image from: www.greatist.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

 

6 Tips to Keep Your Bike Rolling Along

By Jesse Roberson

Springtime is coming, the cold air will soon disappear, snow will be replaced with rain, and the green grass will reach up from the ground to meet the warm sunshine. A warm breeze will fill the air and I can almost hear the faint noise of a lawn mower running.  Every year when this time comes I dart to my garage to get my bike and go for a ride.

When I get there, I find my bike dirty, and rusty. I try to go for a ride, but the tires are flat.  So I dig up my pump and air the tires with plans of riding anyway.  Not far from the house I find my brakes make an awful squealing sound.  A sound so terrifying it brings the neighbors kids to tears.  Not to mention I have to walk up the first hill I come to due to the chain falling off.  After fighting the chain back on I decide to head back to the house.  I am disappointed, disgusted, and bleeding.  There is no way I can go wheel around until I get a tune up, so I load up the bike and run down to the bike shop to get the bike ready for the season.

There 6 areas of attention to consider when getting your bike ready for the season:

  1. Tubes – tubes lose air over time, a good tire pump is a must have to get those flat tires rolling again.  If inflating the tires doesn’t fix the problem, get new tubes.
  2. Tires – Tires are made of rubber, and over winter the rubber can get hard and crack.  If your tires show cracks it is time to replace them.  Inspect them closely.
  3. Chain & gears – A bicycle’s chain and gears is the hardest thing to keep from getting dirty and rusty.  But no fear, just get some Teflon based lubricant at your local bike shop and spray on the chain.  Any excess lube should be wiped off with a clean rag.  Some rusty chains will call for a degreaser to be used to clean the rust away before applying any lubricant.
  4. Cables, Cables, Cables, Cables – Check your brake and shifter cables for any corrosion or fraying.  A corroded cable will not move smoothly causing your brakes or shifters to not work properly.  A frayed cable can break, or cut the rider during use.  Also inspect the housing around the cables for any kinks or cracks, as this will lead to corrosion inside the housing where you can not see.
  5. Brakes – Most brake pads are made of rubber and can get very hard after sitting for the winter, causing loud squeaks and squeals. Squeaks and squeals can also be from misalignment of the brake pads.  After a season of wear, make sure to get your brakes adjusted at least every season.
  6. Shocks – Shocks may need attention after sitting for the cold months.  If the bike is hung upside down, or vertically, your shocks will need some maintenance.  Check the shock slider tubes for wear, or excessive oil.  Shocks require professional service to maintain, see you local shop for repair.

When these 6 areas are all clear of damage, cleaned and adjusted, the bike will roll along quietly and easily.   With your freshly tuned bicycle you can get out for a ride and enjoy the warmer weather.

Regardless if you use your bike daily, weekly, or for occasional neighborhood rides, a properly working bicycle will make your experience more enjoyable.  Don’t forget to wear your helmet, and enjoy your ride wherever it may lead you.

Image from: vic.edu

Jesse Roberson works at Scheller’s Fitness and Cycling in Middletown. For more information go to www.schellers.com.

 

Does Exercise Run Your Life?

By Paul Salmon, PhD, MS

From time to time, you hear people * especially those just starting exercise programs — express concern that they may end up looking like overly muscular weightlifters or rail-thin distance runners, as if they have little control over the fitness process and where it may lead them. Usually, this reflects a lack of appreciation for the time, effort, and dedication it typically takes to make significant gains in strength, endurance, or flexibility. It turns out that, whereas basic health-protective benefits of exercise are attainable for a comparatively modest but sustained investment of time and energy, moving beyond this into the realm of higher level strength building or cardiovascular conditioning requires much greater effort and time than most people are willing or able to sustain.

For some people, however, exercise does seem to gradually take over their lives. For some, this process may take the form of single-minded dedication to sports or athletic training programs that eventually pay off in positive ways without completely dominating their lives. For others, however, the end result can be an unhealthy form of compulsion, much like substance dependence or even addiction. Some athletes, for example, respond to the intense pressures of making a team, striving for starting positions, and excelling in competition by developing excessive training regimens that virtually consume their lives.

Ironically, this pattern can evolves into overtraining, a mix of physiological and psychological symptoms marked by fatigue, exhaustion, depression, immune system dysregulation, and impaired performance. Not surprisingly, rest is the most effective antidote. In an interesting way, overtraining may be the body’s way of self-limiting excessive, maladaptive activity, a protective mechanism that eventually gets triggered in the absence of effective cognitive controls. In some ways, overtraining is not really so hard to understand, because of the powerful motivation provided by rewards for those who eventually do succeed in our achievement-driven culture.

But you don’t have to be a high-performance athlete to run the risk of developing a pattern of compulsive/dependent exercise. In part, this has to do with the fact that exercise is linked to such a wide range of motivations, some very powerful. In addition to simply feeling good and being enjoyable in a very straightforward way, exercise can be an effective distraction from stressful life situations; a way of boosting self-esteem and belief in one’s performance capacity (‘self-efficacy’); an avenue for success that may be lacking on other aspects of one’s life; and so forth.

Researchers Heather Hausenblas at the University of Florida and Danielle Symons Downs at Penn State University are investigating this problem, and in the course of their work developed what they have called the Exercise Dependence Scale. They liken exercise dependence to the concept of ‘substance dependence’, as defined by American Psychiatric Association criteria (DSM-IV), and although considerable research is needed to validate this comparison, it appears to make some sense at a basic level.

Using terminology associated with substance abuse/dependence, they highlight the following behavior patterns as suggestive of compulsive/dependent exercise patterns:

* “tolerance”: steadily increasing the amount of exercise to achieve a given effect
* “withdrawal”: unpleasant side effects of not exercise (excess fatigue, anxiety, etc.)
*exercising in longer bouts or over a longer time period than intended
*desiring, but being unable, to reduce or control exercise
*spending excessive time in exercise preparation or pursuits
*reduced time for other customary activities (social, occupational, leisure)
*continuing to exercise despite a problem likely caused by exercise (e.g. running injury)

The bottom line? Determine if you are in control of your exercise patterns. Do you know when to stop? Can you periodically take time off? Is exercise the focus of your life? Do you enjoy it? Remember that moderation is a good principle to apply in this and most other aspects of life.

Image from: www.everymantri.com

Paul Salmon, Ph.D., M.S., is an Associate Professor at UofL specializing in Exercise Psychology. He is an ACSM-certified Health Fitness Instructor.

Mexican Quinoa Stuffed Peppers

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is considered a whole grain but it is really a seed. Quinoa is high in protein and dietary fiber. It contains more high quality protein than any other grain. Quinoa is considered a complete protein because it contains all the 9 essential amino acids. It does not contain any gluten.  Quinoa is a perfect food for vegetarians, vegans and people who are lactose intolerance or gluten intolerant.

Quinoa can be served hot or cold. It can be served as a side dish, in soups, as a pilaf or as a breakfast cereal.  One cup of cooked quinoa has 222 calories, 8 grams of protein, 4 grams of fat, 32 grams of carbohydrate and 5 grams of dietary fiber.  Quinoa is a good source of magnesium, iron, selenium, calcium, folate and vitamin E.  I typically use quinoa in the place of rice or couscous. It takes about 10 – 15 minutes to cook. I typically cook a batch and store in the refrigerator.  It can be stored up to 4 days. I use it in soups and as a base for stir fry vegetables.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  462 calories, 32 grams protein, 9 grams of fat,  59 grams of CHO,  13 grams dietary fiber,  1947 mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  20 minutes         Cook Time: 30 minutes

Serves:  4

 Ingredients

  • 1 cup uncooked quinoa
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 large green peppers or other peppers of choice
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • ½ lb fresh mushrooms, sliced
  • 4 oz fresh spinach
  • 1 tbsp butter or trans-fat free margarine
  • 1 – 28 oz can diced tomatoes, drained but reserve the juice
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 – 15.5 oz jar of thick salsa or 2 cups of homemade thick salsa
  • 10 oz mozzarella cheese, shredded

 

Instructions

Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees. Cook the quinoa following basic directions (add 1 cup quinoa to 2 cups boiling water, return to boil, then lower heat & simmer until water is absorbed  about 15 minutes).  Cut the seeds out of the peppers. Steam green peppers until soft BUT no limp. In a large skillet, sauté onion & mushrooms in the butter.  Add drained tomatoes, crushed garlic, salsa & spinach.  Cook over medium heat for 10 minutes, then simmer for 10 minutes. Fold in cooked quinoa. Place peppers into a baking dish. Fill each pepper equally with the quinoa/vegetable mixture.  Pour 1/2 reserved tomato juice into the 4 peppers equally & then pour the rest of the tomato juice around the peppers.  Sprinkle the shredded mozzarella cheese over the peppers equally.  Bake for 30 – 35 minutes.

 

Shopping List

  • quinoa
  • 4 large green peppers or other peppers of choice
  • 1 medium onion
  • ½ lb fresh mushrooms
  • 4 oz fresh spinach
  • butter or trans-fat free margarine
  • 1 – 28 oz can diced tomatoes
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 – 15.5 oz jar of thick salsa
  • 10 oz mozzarella cheese, shredded

Image from: www.homesavvyatoz.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 12 grandchildren.    

 

 

Can Your Diet Prevent Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Macular degeneration is deterioration of the retina which can cause blurred vision and even blindness in older men and women. It is the leading cause of blindness in the US for people over 50.  Four antioxidants which are effective in protecting your eyes are: lutein, zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E. Carotenoids are antioxidants that can attach to destructive free radicals in cells thus making free radical inactive & unable to destroy healthy cells.  Research has suggested that two carotenoids,  lutein and zeaxanthin, may help prevent and slow the progress of age-related macular degeneration.

Both of these carotenoids are present in the retina of your eye.

 

Best food sources for Lutein & Zeaxanthin: kale, collard greens, spinach, Swiss chard, summer squash (all varieties), pumpkin, Brussels sprouts, turnip greens, broccoli, yellow corn, green peas, orange and green  peppers, carrots, lettuce (butternut, Boston, Bibb, romaine), asparagus, okra, radicchio, green beans, persimmons and tangerines.   

 

Best food sources for vitamin C: oranges and juice, grapefruit and juice (pink & white), all colors bell peppers, strawberries, guava, pineapple, papaya, lemons, kiwis, cantaloupe, mangos, clementines, raspberries, blackberries, watermelon, tangerines persimmons, broccoli, kale, Brussels sprouts, kidney beans, all varieties of cabbage, cauliflower, sugar snap peas, snow peas, mustard and turnip greens, red and green tomatoes, summer squash, okra and white potatoes (with skin).

 

Best food sources for Vitamin E: kiwi, mango, avocado, peaches, tomato paste, red bell peppers, turnip greens, asparagus, radicchio, collard greens, broccoli, Swiss chard, spinach, almonds, hazelnuts, peanut butter, peanuts, pine nuts, Brazil nuts, wheat germ and wheat germ oil, fortified whole-grain cereals, sunflower seeds, canola oil, olive oil, and flaxseed oil.

 

 

What is the Nutritional Bottom Line?

Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables each day is currently recommended by the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This strategy can provide more than 100 milligrams of vitamin C and 5 to 6 milligrams of carotenoids, including lutein and zeaxanthin if you choose colorful fruits and vegetables daily.  In addition, eating two servings of nuts and seeds can provide 8–14 milligrams of vitamin E (11.9–20.8 IU).  Food sources of these nutrients are the best choice because they contain a wide range of other nutrients. By making better food choices, let your food be your medicine & help prevent blindness as you age.

 

Resources

www.mayoclinic.com

www.aoa.org

 

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N, is a registered dietitian who has been teaching healthy lifestyles strategies to consumers for over 35+ years. Barbara has a new health and wellness online magazine as well.

 

Foods that Contain Lutein*

Food Serving Milligrams (mg)
Kale, cooked 1 cup 23.8
Spinach, cooked 1 cup 20.4
Collards, cooked 1 cup 14.6
Turnip green, cooked 1 cup 12.2
Spinach, fresh 1 cup 3.8
Winter squash, cooked 1 cup 2.8
Corn, can or cooked 1 cup 2.2
Green peas, canned 1 cup 2.2
Broccoli, cooked 1 cup 1.6
Romaine Lettuce, fresh 1 cup 1.3
Carrots, cooked 1 cup 1.1
Green beans, cooked 1 cup 0.8
Egg 1 large 0.15
Orange 1 medium 0.2

 

Resource: American Optometric Association

 

Foods that Contain Zeaxanthin*

Food Serving Milligrams (mg)
Kale, cooked 1 cup 11 – 20
Spinach, cooked 1 cup 5.9 – 12.7
Collards, cooked 1 cup .37 – 5.1
Turnip green, cooked 1 cup 5.1 – 12.2
Spinach, fresh 1 cup 3.6
Corn, can or cooked 1 cup 2.8 – 3.1
Broccoli, cooked 1 cup 3.4
Green pepper 1 cup 1.7
Persimmons 1 cup 0.8
Egg 1 large 0.25
Orange juice 1 cup 0.34 – 0.2

 

*There is no recommended daily intake of either lutein or zeaxanthin, but research suggests that 10 mg/day of lutein and 2 mg per day of zeaxanthin would provide assistance in preventing macular degeneration.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 12 grandchildren.