Fish with Veggies in a Packet

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s an easy recipe that requires very little clean-up. Plus the whole meal is in the packet.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  284 calories,  28 grams protein, 3 grams of fat,  36 grams of CHO, 5 grams dietary fiber,  475 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 15 minutes  Cook Time: 30 minutes

Serves:  4

Ingredients

  • Cooking Spray
  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried dillweed
  • 4 small baking potatoes, sliced thin
  • 1 cups thinly sliced onions (about 2 medium)
  • 2 cups thinly sliced zucchini
  • 1 cup of thinly sliced carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 4 (4-ounce) halibut fillets (or any other firm white fish) 

Instructions

Coat one side of 4 (18-inch) squares of heavy-duty aluminum with cooking spray.  Combine lemon pepper, salt, and dillweed mixing well. Arrange ¼ of the sliced potatoes in center of each foil. Sprinkle potatoes with 1/8 of seasoning in each packet. Place ¼ of the onions & zucchini on top of the potatoes. Sprinkle with 1/8 of the seasoning. Add ¼ of the carrots & sprinkle with rest of the seasoning.  Place fish over all the vegetables. Crimp edges to seal the wrap. Put each foil packet on a baking sheet. Bake at 450 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes or until the fish flakes when tested with a fork. Clean up made easy!

Shopping List

  • Cooking Spray
  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried dillweed
  • 4 small baking potatoes, sliced thin
  • 1 cups thinly sliced onions (about 2 medium)
  • 2 cups thinly sliced zucchini
  • 1 cup of thinly sliced carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 4 (4-ounce) halibut fillets (or any other firm white fish)

 Image from: www.mealplanningmoms.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

What does hydration have to do with senior’s health?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I participated in a webinar sponsored by the Coca Cola Company. Ron Maughan, PhD, discussed Hydration, Health and Performance. He presented some very interesting data regarding chronic dehydration (hypohydration) in the elderly and how it affects their health status*. Dr. Maughan reported chronic dehydration in the elderly may be associated with a decline in physical function and also a decline in their cognitive status. Apparently, dehydration can be due to a reduced thirst sensation which occurs as people get older.

In addition, some drugs that seniors routinely take may also suppress their thirst.  These drug classes include: SSRI’s, ACE Inhibitors and also anti-Parkinson drugs. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) are a class of compounds typically used as antidepressants in the treatment of depressionanxiety disorders, and some personality disorders. They are also typically effective and used in treating some cases of insomnia. Many seniors routinely take anti-depressants.

Signs & Symptoms of Dehydration

Unfortunately, some of the signs and symptoms of dehydration can be identical to senile dementia symptoms, age dementia symptoms and Alzheimer’s symptoms. Correcting dehydration can allow the senior to return to a full and normal life. But, not correcting the dehydration may actually ensure the hospitalization of the senior.

The most common signs and symptoms of dehydration include persistent fatigue, lethargy, muscle weakness or cramps, headaches, dizziness, nausea, forgetfulness, confusion, deep rapid breathing, or an increased heart rate. Dehydration is a very serious condition, more than most people realize. Since seniors often have a reduced sense of thirst, dehydration is one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization after age 65.

Other less common signs and symptoms of dehydration can include:

  • Excessive loss of fluid through vomiting, urinating, stools or sweating
  • Poor intake of fluids, “can’t keep anything down”
  • Sunken eyes
  • Dry or sticky mucous membranes in the mouth
  • Skin that lacks its normal elasticity and sags back into position slowly when pinched up into a fold
  • Decreased or absent urine output
  • Decreased tears

After reviewing these symptoms, if you or your family member has any of

these symptoms, maybe dehydration is the cause of the confusion rather than a diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer’s.

 

Dehydration Can Cause Death

According to Dr. Maughan, about 50% of elderly hospitalized with dehydration died within a year of admission. In fact, readmission rates are high due to repeated dehydration. Hospitalization of elderly with a diagnosis of dehydration is a serious and costly medical problem but preventable.

Prevention of Dehydration in Seniors

Prevention is key to helping seniors remain healthy and also will help drive down costs. Although most people get about 20% of their fluid intake from food, most seniors get about half their fluid intake from solid foods such as fruits and vegetables because seniors have a reduced sense of thirst.  In addition to a reduced sense of thirst seniors also have a reduced appetite.  Reduced thirst and reduced appetite may also be due to their medications. Proper hydration may be a challenge but one strategy that will help keep seniors healthy, alert, active and out of the hospital.

Institutionalized seniors may need between 1,700 milliliters or 56 ounces and 2,000 milliliters or 67 ounces of daily fluid**. The Institute of Medicine advises men to consume about 13 cups of fluids per day and women should consume about 9 cups per day.

Another way to determine hydration is the color of one’s urine. Urine color for the first void of the day is typically yellow but as the day goes on urine color should be pale (slightly yellow) to colorless. If not, more fluids need to be ingested.

Here’s a Urine Color Chart that you might find useful, http://www.rte.ie/tv/useitorloseit/hydration.pdf.  Check out Table 1. Water Content of Fruits & Vegetables.

Table 1. Water Content of Fruits & Vegetables

Food                                                % of Water

Apples (raw)
Applesauce (canned, sweetened)
Apricots (raw)
Apricots (canned)
Asparagus (cooked)
84%
80%
86%
78%
91%
Avocados (raw)
Bananas (raw)
Bell Peppers (raw)
Blackberries (raw)
Blueberries (raw)%
73%
74%
92%
86%
85%
Broccoli (cooked)
Broccoli (flower clusters, raw)
Cabbage (raw)
Cantaloupe (raw)
Carrots (raw)
91%
91%
92%
90%
88%
Cauliflower (raw)
Cauliflower (cooked)
Celery (raw)
Cherries (raw)
Corn (1 ear, cooked)
92%
93%
95%
81%
70%
Cucumbers (raw)
Grapefruit (pink or red, raw)
Grapes (raw)
Honeydew Melon (raw)
Kiwi fruit (raw)
96%
91%
81%
90%
83%
Lettuce (raw)
Mangoes (raw)
Nectarines (raw)
Olives (ripe, canned)
Oranges (raw)
96%
82%
86%
80%
87%
Peaches (raw)
Peaches (canned)
Pears (raw)
Pears (canned)
Plums (raw)
88%
79%
84%
80%
85%
Potato (baked)
Raspberries (raw)
Strawberries (raw)
Tangerines (raw)
Tomatoes (raw)
Watermelons (raw)
75%
87%
92%
88%
94%
92%

*Warren et al (1994). The burden and outcomes associated with dehydration among US elderly. 1991. Am J Public Health 84, 1265 – 1269.

**Chidester JC et al (1997). Fluid Intake in the institutionalized elderly. JADA, 97, 23-28.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

 

 

Avocado Cabbage Carrot Coleslaw

avocado coleslaw

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Excellent side dish with a creamy avocado-cilantro dressing.  Not low in calories but lots of nutrients, antioxidants & dietary fiber.

Nutritional Information Per Serving: 224 calories, 4 grams protein, 15 grams of fat,  24 grams of CHO,  10 grams dietary fiber,  59 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 10 minutes    

Serves:  4

Ingredients

  • 2 ripe fresh avocados, halved, seeded, diced and divided
  • ¼ cup white vinegar
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 4 cups sliced green cabbage
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • ½ cup diced red onion
  • ¼ cup chopped cilantro
  • Salt & pepper to taste

 

Instructions

Place one avocado, vinegar, water, sugar and cumin in a blender. Blend on puree until smooth.  In a large bowl, combine cabbage, carrots, onion, cilantro and avocado.  Pour avocado dressing over cabbage mixture & mix well. Salt and pepper to taste.

 

Shopping List

  • 2 ripe fresh avocados
  • white vinegar
  • sugar
  • ground cumin
  • green cabbage*
  • carrots
  • red onion
  • fresh cilantro

 

*Can buy sliced cabbage to save time.

 

Recipe Adopted from www.loveonetoday.com

Image from: https://www.pinterest.com/source/paradisegroveavocados.com/

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

 

Almond Crusted Salmon

crusted-salmon-ck-1662863-x

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Nutrition Information Per Serving: 326 calories, 29 grams protein, 16 grams of fat, 16 grams of CHO, 3 grams of fiber, 275  mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 10 minutes   Cook Time: 15 minutes

Serves: 6

Ingredients*

  • 1 cup slivered almonds, finely chopped (use food processor, it’s easier)
  • ¼ cup plain bread crumbs
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • ½ tsp Old Bay Seasoning
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup egg whites, beaten or 1 large egg, beaten with 1 tbsp water
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 1 ½ pounds salmon (6 fillets)

Instructions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Spray baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. Combine the almonds, bread crumbs, brown sugar, Old Bay seasoning, and salt in a shallow pan. Place beaten egg (or egg whites) and water in another pan and the flour in another shallow pan or plate. Season fish with additional salt and pepper (optional). Bread each fish fillet by coating both sides with flour, then dip in egg mixture then coat evenly with nut mixture. Place each fillet on the baking sheet and bake until golden brown about 15 minutes.

Shopping List

  • slivered almonds, finely chopped (use food processor, it’s easier)
  • plain bread crumbs
  • brown sugar
  • ½ tsp Old Bay Seasoning
  • large egg or egg whites
  • 1 ½ pounds salmon (6 fillets)

*Can  substitute other fish like tilapia, halibut, or whitefish.  Can also substitute pecans for almonds.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.

 

Grilled Portobello Sandwich

portobello-sandwich-large

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s a really great vegetarian sandwich with lots of anti-oxidants and tastes good, too. You can cut the calories by using a 100% whole wheat sandwich thin. Enjoy!

Per Serving: 270  calories, 9 grams protein, 10 grams of fat, 38 grams of CHO, 3 grams of fiber,  390 mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes 

Serves:  6

 Ingredients

For the Portobello mushrooms

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh basil
  • salt to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 portobello mushrooms

For sandwiches:

  • ¾ cup cream cheese, low fat whipped, or goat cheese
  • 6 pieces of focaccia or other good quality bread, sliced in half, lengthwise
  • 1 cup spinach, or arugula leaves, washed and dried
  • 6 slices of tomato

Instructions

For the Portobello mushrooms:

Preheat the grill.  Mix the olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper, and 1 teaspoon of the basil together.  Remove the stems from the mushrooms and brush both sides of the caps with the olive oil mixture.  Set aside.  Gill the mushrooms until they are soft in the center, about 3 to 4 minutes on each side.  Slice each cap on the diagonal into 1” strips.

For the sandwiches:

Mix the cheese, the remaining teaspoon of basil, salt and pepper together.  Set aside.  Spread 6 halves of bread with the cheese mixture, then top with the spinach or arugula, a slice of tomato and several Portobello mushrooms strips.  Place the other half of the bread on top.

 

Shopping List

  • olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • fresh basil
  • 6 portobello mushrooms
  • cream cheese, low fat whipped, or goat cheese
  • 6 pieces of focaccia
  • spinach, or arugula leaves
  • tomato

Note: You can make it quicker, substitute ½ a roasted red pepper for each slice of tomato.  Make it seasonal – steps 2 through 4 can be done ahead.  The ingredients will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

Be Wise Portion Size when Eating Out

family_at_diner_200

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

 

Below are a number of strategies to help you make healthier low calorie choices when you are eating out. Be wise and portion size when you are eating out.

Eating Out Strategies:

  1. Go online to see what choices you have available to help you manage your waist.
  2. Be assertive.
  3. Get the Doggie Bag with dinner, split the meal before eating it.
  4. Don’t feel guilty about eating.
  5. Eat slowly and taste every bite.
  6. Eat till you feel full not stuffed!
  7. Concentrate on the atmosphere.
  8. Don’t drink your calories!
  9. Make appetizers the meal.
  10. Breads are fattening but the added butter is.
  11. Salads aren’t always low calorie fare.
  12. Beware of Reduced Calorie salad dressings.
  13. Always ask for your dressing served on the side of the salad.
  14. Vinegar like balsamic, red wine & tarragon, no calories.
  15. Split an Entrée & have an extra salad.
  16. Share a dessert if you must.
  17. Order the luncheon  or Appetizer  Portion

 

Know Menu Terminology

  1. Leaner ways to cook meats & vegetables: broiling, roasting, char grilling, grilling, poaching, stir-frying, boiling & steaming.
  2. Restaurants may brush or baste meats with fats during or after the cooking process.
  3. Some meat may be marinated in oil or a high fat substance.
  4. The term PRIME means very high in fat due to marbling

 

 

Terms that Indicate High-fat, High Calorie Prepared Food

Fried

Pan-fried

Hollandaise

Crispy

Escalloped

Creamed

Creamy

Stewed

In its Own Gravy

Buttery

Casserole

Au Gratin

In a Butter Sauce

Hash

Parmesan

In a Cream Sauce

In a Cheese Sauce

Pot Pie

 

Choose These Foods Lower Calorie Prepared Food

Baked

Barbecued

Blanched

Broiled

Charbroiled

Grilled

Herbs & spices

Marinated

Plank-grilled

Poached

Roasted

Rotisserie

Sauteed

Steamed

Stir -Fried

Tomato Sauce

 

Hamburger Fast Food Green Light Choices

  • Single hamburger or cheeseburger
  • Grilled chicken sandwich
  • Grilled chicken salad
  • Baked potato with chili or broccoli
  • Small order French fries
  • Garden and side salad – use light dressing
  • Frozen yogurt

 

Mexican Green Light Choices

  • Black bean, tortilla soup or gazpacho
  • Mexican or taco salad (don’t eat the fried shell)
  • Arroz con pollo (chicken and rice)
  • Burritos and Enchiladas
  • Fajitas
  • Soft tacos
  • Black or pinto beans (not refried beans with cheese)
  • Mexican rice
  • Pico de gallo
  • All hot sauces

 

Chinese Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Wonton, egg drop or hot & sour soup
  • Teriyaki beef or chicken
  • Chop suey or chow mein
  • Vegetarian stir-fry dishes

Italian Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Marinated vegetable salad
  • Minestrone soup
  • Shrimp cocktail
  • Pasta with tomato sauce or marinara sauce
  • Chicken or veal cacciatore, light wine or light tomato sauce
  • Chicken or shrimp primavera (no cream in sauce)

American Food Restaurant Green Choices

  • Broth-based soups
  • Chili (hold the cheese and sour cream)
  • Peel and eat shrimp
  • Salad with light or fat free dressing on the side
  • Salad with grilled tuna or chicken
  • Teriyaki or BBQ chicken breast
  • Fajitas

 

 

Applebee’s

Oops!

Fiesta Lime Chicken with Sauce, Cheese, Tortilla Strips, Salsa & Rice

1,285 calories, 47 g fat, 1,443 mg sodium

Grilled Steak Caesar Salad with Toast

1,295 calories, 82 g fat, 2,199 mg sodium

Southwest Philly Roll-Up with Salsa

1,605 calories, 121 g fat, 2,338 mg sodium

Smart Options but…

Grilled Cajun Lime Tilapia with Black Beans & Corn Salsa

310 calories, 6 g fat, 1,250 mg sodium

Crispy Buttermilk Shrimp with Potatoes & Toast

843 calories, 34 g fat, 1,563 mg sodium

Teriyaki Steak & Shrimp Skewers

370 calories, 7 g fat, 1,475 mg sodium

Arby’s

Oops!

Roast Beef & Swiss Market Fresh Sandwich

810 calories, 42 g fat, 1,780 mg sodium

Chicken Salad w/Pecans Sandwich

789 calories, 39 g fat, 1,240 mg sodium

Santa Fe Salad

773 calories, 52 g fat, 1,823 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Grilled Cajun Lime Tilapia with Black Beans & Corn Salsa

440 calories, 19 g fat, 1,061 mg sodium

Chicken Cordon Bleu Sandwich

488 calories, 18 g fat, 1,560 mg sodium

Martha’s Vineyard Salad with Light Buttermilk Dressing

339 calories, 14 g fat, 923 mg sodium

Jimmy John’s

Oops!

Turkey Tom w/Alfalfa Sprouts, Tomatoes, Lettuce, & Mayo

555 calories, 26 g fat, 1,342 mg sodium

Pepe Sub-Ham, Provolone, Lettuce, Tomato, Mayo

684 calories, 37 g fat, 1,659 mg sodium

Gourmet Veggie Club-Provolone, Avocado, Cucumber, Alfalfa, Lettuce, Tomato, Mayo

856 calories, 46 g fat, 1,500 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Turkey Breast Slim Sub w/Alfalfa Sprouts, Tomatoes, Onion, Cucumber & Avocado Spread

426 calories, 2 g fat, 1,439 mg sodium

Totally Tuna Sub

507 calories, 20 g fat, 1,279 mg sodium

Vegetarian Sub w/Avocado Spread, Cucumber, Lettuce, Tomatoes, Alfalfa Sprouts

290 calories, 1.5 g fat, 628 mg sodium

 

Chick-Fil-A

Oops!

Chicken Caesar Cool Wrap

480 calories, 16 g fat, 1,640 mg sodium

Chick-fil-A Chicken Sandwich

420 calories, 16 g fat, 1,300 mg sodium

Chick-fil-A Chick-n Strips Salad with Buttermilk Dressing

800 calories, 60 g fat, 1,745 mg sodium

Chicken, Egg & Cheese on Sunflower Multigrain Bagel

500 calories, 20 g fat, 1,260 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Chick-fil-A Nuggets (8-pack) with Barbecue Sauce

305 calories, 13 g fat, 1,020 mg sodium

Chick-fil-A Southwest Chargrilled Salad with fat-free honey mustard dressing

360 calories, 8 g fat, 1,170 mg sodium

Biscuit & Gravy

330 calories, 15 g fat, 970 mg sodium

Fazzoli’s

Oops!

Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce & Spicy Italian Sausage w/ Caesar Side Salad

1,030 calories, 53.5 g fat, 2,040 mg sodium

Baked Spaghetti with Meatballs

940 calories, 40 g fat, 2,370 sodium

Original Submarine

940 calories, 58 g fat, 3,040 mg sodium

Parmesan Chicken Salad with Ranch Dressing

580 calories, 39 g fat, 1,270 sodium

Oops!

Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce & Spicy Italian Sausage w/ Caesar Side Salad

1,030 calories, 53.5 g fat, 2,040 mg sodium

Baked Spaghetti with Meatballs

940 calories, 40 g fat, 2,370 sodium

Original Submarine

940 calories, 58 g fat, 3,040 mg sodium

Parmesan Chicken Salad with Ranch Dressing

580 calories, 39 g fat, 1,270 sodium

KFC

Oops!

KFC Famous Bowl with Mashed Potatoes & Gravy

740 calories, 35 g fat, 2,350 mg sodium

Popcorn Chicken – Individual

400 calories, 26 g fat, 1,160 mg sodium

Crispy Caesar Salad w/Creamy Parm Caesar Dress w/ Croutons

670 calories, 48 g fat, 1,755 mg sodium

Apple Pie Minis (3)

370 calories, 20 g fat, 260 mg sodium

Smart options but…

3 Crispy Strips, Green Beans, & 3” Corn on Cob

470 calories, 22 g fat, 1,775 mg sodium

Honey BBQ KFC Snacker

210 calories, 3 g fat, 530 mg sodium

Roasted BLT Salad w/Fat Free Ranch Dressing

235 calories, 6 g fat, 1,290 mg sodium

Sweet Life Oatmeal Raisin Cookie

150 calories, 5 g fat, 135 mg sodium

Olive Garden

Oops!

Stuffed Chicken Marsala w/Garlic Parmesan Mash Potatoes

1,315 calories, 86 g fat, 2,550 mg sodium

Mixed Grill w/Vegetables & Mashed Potatoes

839 calories, 43 g fat, 1,541 mg sodium

Pork Filettino w/Potatoes & Bell Peppers

1,011 calories, 57 g fat, 2,479 mg sodium

 

Smart options but…

Linguine Alla Marinara with a Breadstick

691 calories, 9.5 g fat, 1,040 mg sodium

Shrimp Primavera

706 calories, 18 g fat, 1,220 mg sodium

Chicken Giardino

448 calories, 11 g fat, 1,670 mg sodium

 

Outback Steakhouse

Oops!

Ayers Rock Strip Steak w/Sautéed Mushrooms & Loaded Jacket Potato

1,450 calories, 85 g fat

Outback Special (11 oz) w/Sautéed Mushrooms

960 calories, 61 g fat

Half a Bloomin’ Onion

1,155 calories, 67 g fat

Smart options but…

Prime Minister’s Prime Rib w/Fresh Veggies & Sweet Potato

730 calories, 39 g fat

Victoria Filet (9 oz) with Steamed Vegetables

639 calories, 45 g fat

Half an Order of Shrimp on the Barbie w/Bread

330 calories, 21 g fat

PF Chang’s

Oops!

Sriracha Shrimp Salad

1,130 calories, 46 g fat

Salt & Pepper Calamari

770 calories, 50 g fat

Kung Pao Chicken

1,240 calories, 80 g fat

Spicy Green beans

 

Smart options but…

Wild Alaskan Sockeye Steamed with Ginger

750 calories, 50 g fat

Seared Ahi Tuna

260 calories, 6 g fat

Ginger Chicken & Broccoli

660 calories, 26 g fat

Sichuan-Style Asparagus

200 calories, 6 g fat

Quizno’s

Oops!

Small Honey Mustard Chicken Sub

550 calories, 30 g fat, 1,140 mg sodium

Small Prime Rib Cheesesteak

680 calories, 42 g fat, 1,070 mg sodium

Small Turkey Ranch & Swiss Sandwich

450 calories, 22.5 g fat, 1,380 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Small Honey Bourbon Chicken on Wheat Bread

310 calories, 4 g fat, 920 mg sodium

Small Black Angus Sandwich

520 calories, 16.5 g fat, 1,550 mg sodium

Small Tuscan Turkey

390 calories, 14 g fat, 1,185 mg sodium

Red Lobster

Oops!

North Pacific King Crab Legs with Melted Butter w/Rice Pilaf

883 calories, 35 g fat

Snow Crab Legs w/Melted Butter & a Cheddar Bay Biscuit

611 calories, 34.5 g fat

Crab Alfredo

1,170 calories, 66 g fat

Smart options but…

Live Maine Lobster (1.24 lbs) w/Cocktail Sauce & Seasoned Broccoli

288 calories, 3 g fat

Garlic Grilled Jumbo Shrimp

329 calories, 5 g fat

Broiled Flounder w/Lemon Juice & a Garden Salad w/Red Wine Vinaigrette

344 calories, 10 g fat

Romano’s Macaroni Grill

Oops!

Chicken Caesar

920 calories, 69 g fat, 1,660 mg sodium

Chicken Portobello

1,020 calories, 66 g fat, 7,300 mg sodium

Grilled Salmon Teriyaki

1,230 calories, 74 g fat, 6,590 mg sodium

Half Order of Mozzarella Fritta

Smart options but…

½ Pizza Margherita & Caesar Della Casa w/Low Fat Caesar Dr

645 calories, 24 g fat, 1,665 mg sodium

Pollo Magro

330 calories, 5 g fat, 770 mg sodium

Simple Salmon

590 calories, 40 g fat, 1,390 mg sodium

Half Order of Mozzarella Alla Caprese

260 calories, 21 g fat, 410 mg sodium

Ruby Tuesday’s

Oops!

Turkey Burger with Fries

1,171 calories, 58 g fat

Parmesan Shrimp Penne

1,221 calories, 64 g fat

Southwestern Spring Rolls (4 rolls)

708 calories, 40 g fat

Broccoli & Cheese Soup

443 calories, 34 g fat

Smart options but..

7 oz Top Sirloin w/Baby Green Beans & Baby Portabella Mushrooms

464 calories, 24 g fat

Creole Catch w/Couscous w/Baby Green Beans

580 calories, 26 g fat

Asian Dumplings (4 dumplings)

440 calories, 20 g fat

White Bean Chicken Chili w/Tomato & Mozzarella Salad

370 calories, 15 g fat

Taco Bell

Oops!

Baja Beef Chalupa

410 calories, 27 g fat, 780 mg sodium

Zesty Chicken BORDER BOWL

640 calories, 35 g fat, 1,800 mg sodium

Grilled Stuff Chicken Burrito

640 calories, 23 g fat, 2,160 mg sodium

Caramel Apple Empanadas

290 calories, 14 g fat, 300 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Two Grilled Steak Soft Tacos, Fresco Style

320 calories, 9 g fat, 1,100 mg sodium

Chicken Fiesta Taco Salad w/out Shell

470 calories, 24 g fat, 1,780 mg sodium

Two Spicy Chicken Soft Tacos

340 calories, 12 g fat, 1,160 mg sodium

Cinnamon Twists

170 calories, 7 g fat, 200 mg sodium

Sonic

Oops!

Chicken Club Toaster Sandwich

690 calories, 35 g fat, 1,900 mg sodium

Jumbo Popcorn Chicken Salad

490 calories, 28 g fat, 1,440 mg sodium

Fish Sandwich

640 calories, 31 g fat, 1,1180 mg sodium

Large Hi-C Fruit Punch

290 calories, 0 g fat

Smart options but…

Sonic Burger with Mustard

540 calories, 25 g fat, 730 mg sodium

Grilled Chicken on Ciabatta w/BBQ Sauce

375 calories, 9 g fat, 1,310 mg sodium

Grilled Chicken Wrap

380 calories, 11 g fat, 1,300 mg sodium

Junior Banana Split

200 calories, 4.5 g fat

Wendy’s

Oops!

Roasted Turkey & Swiss Frescata w/Med Fries & Med Coke

1,100 calories, 40 g fat, 1,950 mg sodium

Chicken Club Sandwich

610 calories, 31 g fat, 1,460 mg sodium

2 Junior Cheeseburgers

720 calories, 32 g fat, 1,720 mg sodium

Medium French Fries

420 calories, 20 g fat, 430 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Ultimate Chicken Grill Sandwich w/Side Salad w/Red fat Ranch & Med Iced Tea

540 calories, 22 g fat, 1,780 mg sodium

Small Chili & 5 piece Crispy Chicken Nuggets

450 calories, 21 g fat, 1,300 mg sodium

Single w/ Everything

430 calories, 20 g fat, 900 mg sodium

Sour Cream & Chives Potato

320 calories, 4 g fat, 55 mg sodium

http://investmentwatchblog.com/restaurant-recovery-fizzles-76-percent-of-people-are-cautious-about-spending-and-they-are-eating-out-less-often/

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

 

Dealing with the Picky Eater – The Battle Between Parents and Children

picky girl

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Winning the war on what the child should eat or not eat is a continuing issue in every family in every generation.  Strategies such as, “You’ll sit here until you finish every bite on your plate” and “What do you want to eat – whatever you want, darling,” have not proven effective in ensuring that children eat healthier.

These strategies may help you survive the battle.

  1. Avoid the power struggle.  Don’t say, “Do it, because I’m the parent.”  The child needs to understand the why behind the rules, which may help lay the groundwork for lifelong, sound food choices.
  2. Let children participate in the meal preparation.
  3. Children under five are selective eaters.  That’s a fact.
  4. Introduce new foods slowly. Studies have shown children need to be exposed to a new food 10 to 15 times before they will accept it. Limit exposure to one or two new foods a week. When introducing a new food, serve it alongside familiar foods your child likes.
  5. Never use food as a reward.  Rather than using food as a reward, use something physical and fun – such as a trip to the park or a game of catch or basketball.
  6. Beware of over-snacking.  Knowing how many calories your child needs to eat and keeping track of those calories periodically can help ensure they are getting enough calories, but not too many. (See “How Many Calories Should Your Child Eat Each Day?”)
  7. Don’t label foods as “good” or “bad.”  Tie certain foods with things the child might care about , such as, lean protein helps build muscles and bones, whole grains energize sports performance, and antioxidants in fruits and vegetables help keep skin radiant and hair shiny and healthy.
  8. Be a good role model.  If you don’t eat fruits and vegetables, how can you expect the children to do so?  Your mealtime attitudes have a strong influence on your child’s eating behavior.
  9. Keep healthy foods available and accessible.  Your child can only choose foods that you purchase and bring into your home. Keep a low shelf in the refrigerator stocked with cut-up fresh fruit and other healthy food choices.
  10. Be more creative in your food design and preparation.If a child won’t drink milk, add it to oatmeal, pudding or mashed potatoes.  If a child won’t eat vegetables, serve fresh vegetables with low-fat dressing or puree the vegetables and add them to main dishes or side dishes. Don’t give up.
  11. Give your children small portions.  Children don’t need to eat the same portion sizes as adults.  Too much food can be overwhelming; they can always take seconds.
  12. Make sure the food looks and tastes good.
  13. Some children have food jags.  They will only eat certain foods.  Fortunately, children can thrive on a boring diet.
  14. If your child definitely won’t eat vegetables then boost their vitamin and mineral intake by serving more nutrient-dense fruits such as cantaloupes, berries, red or purple grapes, raisins, kiwi and oranges.
  15. If your child won’t eat meatyou can also puree the meat and add it to sauces.  You can also add gravy to meat, serve it with ketchup or mix it into mashed potatoes. A healthy diet doesn’t have to include meat but needs to include enough dairy products, beans and legumes or soy-based products, which can provide adequate amounts of protein, iron and B vitamins.

Image from: www.babble.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

Dehydration, Confusion & Increased Heart Rate: What Do These Symptoms Have In Common?

sick medicare patient

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I participated in a webinar sponsored by the Coca Cola Company. Ron Maughan, PhD, discussed Hydration, Health and Performance. He presented some very interesting data regarding chronic dehydration (hypohydration) in the elderly and how it affects their health status*. Dr. Maughan reported chronic dehydration in the elderly may be associated with a decline in physical function and also a decline in their cognitive status. Apparently, dehydration can be due to a reduced thirst sensation which occurs as people get older.

In addition, some drugs that seniors routinely take may also suppress their thirst.  These drug classes include: SSRI’s, ACE Inhibitors and also anti-Parkinson drugs. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) are a class of compounds typically used as antidepressants in the treatment of depressionanxiety disorders, and some personality disorders. They are also typically effective and used in treating some cases of insomnia. Many seniors routinely take anti-depressants.

Signs & Symptoms of Dehydration

Unfortunately, some of the signs and symptoms of dehydration can be identical to senile dementia symptoms, age dementia symptoms and Alzheimer’s symptoms. Correcting dehydration can allow the senior to return to a full and normal life. But, not correcting the dehydration may actually ensure the hospitalization of the senior.

The most common signs and symptoms of dehydration include persistent fatigue, lethargy, muscle weakness or cramps, headaches, dizziness, nausea, forgetfulness, confusion, deep rapid breathing, or an increased heart rate. Dehydration is a very serious condition, more than most people realize. Since seniors often have a reduced sense of thirst, dehydration is one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization after age 65.

Other less common signs and symptoms of dehydration can include:

  • Excessive loss of fluid through vomiting, urinating, stools or sweating
  • Poor intake of fluids, “can’t keep anything down”
  • Sunken eyes
  • Dry or sticky mucous membranes in the mouth
  • Skin that lacks its normal elasticity and sags back into position slowly when pinched up into a fold
  • Decreased or absent urine output
  • Decreased tears

After reviewing these symptoms, if you or your family member has any of

these symptoms, maybe dehydration is the cause of the confusion rather than a diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer’s.

 

Dehydration Can Cause Death

According to Dr. Maughan, about 50% of elderly hospitalized with dehydration died within a year of admission. In fact, readmission rates are high due to repeated dehydration. Hospitalization of elderly with a diagnosis of dehydration is a serious and costly medical problem but preventable.

Prevention of Dehydration in Seniors

Prevention is key to helping seniors remain healthy and also will help drive down costs. Although most people get about 20% of their fluid intake from food, most seniors get about half their fluid intake from solid foods such as fruits and vegetables because seniors have a reduced sense of thirst.  In addition to a reduced sense of thirst seniors also have a reduced appetite.  Reduced thirst and reduced appetite may also be due to their medications. Proper hydration may be a challenge but one strategy that will help keep seniors healthy, alert, active and out of the hospital.

Institutionalized seniors may need between 1,700 milliliters or 56 ounces and 2,000 milliliters or 67 ounces of daily fluid**. The Institute of Medicine advises men to consume about 13 cups of fluids per day and women should consume about 9 cups per day.

Another way to determine hydration is the color of one’s urine. Urine color for the first void of the day is typically yellow but as the day goes on urine color should be pale (slightly yellow) to colorless. If not, more fluids need to be ingested.

Here’s a Urine Color Chart that you might find useful, http://www.rte.ie/tv/useitorloseit/hydration.pdf.  Check out Table 1. Water Content of Fruits & Vegetables.

Table 1. Water Content of Fruits & Vegetables

Food                                                % of Water

Apples (raw)
Applesauce (canned, sweetened)
Apricots (raw)
Apricots (canned)
Asparagus (cooked)
84%
80%
86%
78%
91%
Avocados (raw)
Bananas (raw)
Bell Peppers (raw)
Blackberries (raw)
Blueberries (raw)%
73%
74%
92%
86%
85%
Broccoli (cooked)
Broccoli (flower clusters, raw)
Cabbage (raw)
Cantaloupe (raw)
Carrots (raw)
91%
91%
92%
90%
88%
Cauliflower (raw)
Cauliflower (cooked)
Celery (raw)
Cherries (raw)
Corn (1 ear, cooked)
92%
93%
95%
81%
70%
Cucumbers (raw)
Grapefruit (pink or red, raw)
Grapes (raw)
Honeydew Melon (raw)
Kiwi fruit (raw)
96%
91%
81%
90%
83%
Lettuce (raw)
Mangoes (raw)
Nectarines (raw)
Olives (ripe, canned)
Oranges (raw)
96%
82%
86%
80%
87%
Peaches (raw)
Peaches (canned)
Pears (raw)
Pears (canned)
Plums (raw)
88%
79%
84%
80%
85%
Potato (baked)
Raspberries (raw)
Strawberries (raw)
Tangerines (raw)
Tomatoes (raw)
Watermelons (raw)
75%
87%
92%
88%
94%
92%

 

 

 

*Warren et al (1994). The burden and outcomes associated with dehydration among US elderly. 1991. Am J Public Health 84, 1265 – 1269.

**Chidester JC et al (1997). Fluid Intake in the institutionalized elderly. JADA, 97, 23-28.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 12 grandchildren.    

 

 

Grilled Cedar-Planked Salmon

cedar plank salmon

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

My favorite fish is salmon & I especially like it cooked on a cedar plank. I usually eat the cedar plank salmon at a restaurant but here’s a really great recipe you can make at home!

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  208 calories, 23 grams protein, 11 grams of fat,   grams of CHO, <1 grams dietary fiber,  270 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 10 minutes  Plank Soak Time: at least 4 hours 

Serves:  8 four-ounce servings

Ingredients

  • 1 untreated cedar plank (14 X 7 X 1 inch)*
  • ½ cup Kraft Sun Dried Tomato Vinaigrette Dressing
  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • ¼ cup finely chopped oil-packed sun dried tomatoes
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 2 lb salmon fillet 1 inch thick (red snapper, orange roughy)

 

Instructions

Put plank in water & make sure it is completely submerged & soak for at least 4 hours or you can soak overnight. Mix dressing, parsley, & tomatoes.  Brush the plank with oil, then top with salmon.  Put plank on medium heat grill.  Grill for 20 minutes or until the fish easily flakes with a fork. After 10 minutes of grilling salmon, add the dressing mixture to top the salmon.

 

Shopping List

  • 1 untreated cedar plank (14 X 7 X 1 inch)
  • Kraft Sun Dried Tomato Vinaigrette Dressing
  • fresh parsley
  • oil-packed sun dried tomatoes
  • vegetable oil
  • 2 lb salmon fillet 1 inch thick

*You can grill on a sheet of heavy-duty foil instead.

Adapted from: www.Kraft.com

Image from: www.tammysrecipes.com

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

No-Bake Pumpkin Pudding Cheesecake

Double_Layer_Pumpkin_Pie

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s an easy no-bake pumpkin cheesecake recipe for the holidays. But pumpkin shouldn’t just be for Thanksgiving. Pumpkin is high in vitamin A and C plus it’s has some dietary fiber as well.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:   226 calories,  3 grams protein,  8 grams of fat,  37 grams of CHO,  2 grams dietary fiber,  393 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 15 minutes   Chill Time: 3 hours

Serves:  12

Ingredients

  • 4-oz  reduced-fat cream cheese, softened
  • 1 tbsp skim milk
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 ½ cups reduced-fat whipping topping
  • 9-inch prepared graham cracker crust
  • 1 cup COLD skim milk
  • 2 – 3 oz pkgs vanilla flavor instant pudding & pie filling
  • 16-oz can solid pumpkin
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground ginger
  • ¼ tsp ground cloves

Instructions

Mix softened cream cheese, 1 tbsp milk, & sugar in a large bowl with a wire whisk until smooth. Gently  stir in whipped topping. Spread on the bottom of prepared crust. Pour 1 cup skim milk in a bowl. Add pudding mixes & spread over cream cheese layer. Stir in pumpkin & spices, and spread over cream cheese layer. Refrigerate at least 3 hours or until set.

Shopping List

  • 4-oz  reduced-fat cream cheese
  • skim milk
  • reduced-fat whipping topping
  • 9-inch prepared graham cracker crust
  • 2 – 3 oz pkgs vanilla flavor instant pudding & pie filling
  • 16-oz can solid pumpkin
  • cinnamon
  • ground ginger
  • ground cloves

Adapted from Year-Round low-Fat & no-Fat Holiday Meals in Minutes by M.J. Smith, R.D. 1995.

Image from: asweettasteofhome.com/pies_and_brownies

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.