Fitness DVDs Make a Great Christmas Gift

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

          With the economy the way it is, some people may not be able to belong to a fitness center. Fitness DVDs are inexpensive and can be very motivational. Below are ten DVDs that got4- 5 star ratings. The P90X videos are by far the most complete but are also the most expensive. You will need a pull up bar. Many of the DVDs require that you purchase at least 2 sets of dumbbells.

  1. P90X. $119 plus $9.95 for shipping and handling. In just 90 days, you can get back in shape, or build the body you’ve always wanted. All you need is a set of dumbbells or resistance bands, a pull-up bar, and about an hour a day. No gym membership required. You get 12 DVDs. All you need is a small space (about 6 by 6 feet), a set of dumbbells or resistance bands, a pull-up bar, and about an hour a day.  Two of my sons and a bunch of my friends use this program and everyone seems to get great results! It’s expensive but worth it according to my family and friends.

http://www.extremefitnessplans.com/Tony_Horton/P90X_Extreme_Training_System.html

  1. A.S.A.P. Hollywood Bootcamp 4X4. $19.95. If you want to participate in a boot camp but don’t want to get up with the roosters, try a boot camp video. This video is a fast paced series of 60-second intervals: aerobics, lower-body toning, upper-body toning and corework. Each non-stop segment challenges the body in different ways. Requires 3 to 10 lb dumbbells. www.CollageVideo.com.
  2.  Dance Off Inches Line Dance Party or Dance Off the Inches: Sizzling Salsa. Both DVDs are $14.95. The Line Dance Party has 10 simple moves from three traditional dances. The Salsa DVD has three routines that get the hips moving & heart rate souring. www.CollageVideo.com.
  3. Hi/Lo Extreme. $16.95. This is a fast-paced and super-challenging, it’s an ever-changing mix of non-stop cardio combos. You’re sure to burn fat, build stamina … and test your endurance. The exercises include pivots, repeaters and directional changes plus higher-impact ski jumps, power leaps and football-style plyo drills (the last combo is nearly all high-impact, but one person shows an easier variation). www.CollageVideo.com.
  4. Trudie Styler’s Core Strength Pilates. $14.95. A balanced blend of Pilates and stretch with a clear focus on breath cycles (e.g. “on the out-breath, open the body; on the in-breath, bring the body together”). This varied combination of techniques and styles builds strength as it improves flexibility and maximizes relaxation. The toning exercises are familiar Pilates classics while the yoga-based stretch elements include moves like cobra and down dog. The instruction is exceptionally detailed and purposeful. www.CollageVideo.com
  5. Get Extremely Ripped 1,000 with Jari Love. $14.95. An ultra-challenging aero/tone interval program with athletic-style cardio and lots of compound muscle toning. The three-minute, high-impact cardio drills range from L-steps and speed skates to L-hops and jumping jacks (as floor aerobics, they’re tough, but one group even does them using a step). The shorter toning intervals maximize results by working multiple muscles at once. They include a mix of weight-room, compound-muscle and balance exercises. Motivating countdown timer and tribal/drum soundtrack. Requires two sets of dumbbells. www.CollageVideo.com
  6. Rodney Yee Yoga for Beginners. $14.95. This video is a two-workout DVD which features — a superb tutorial and a choice of audio tracks. Rodney and Colleen Saidman show you the exact positions and movements for 20 classic yoga poses. Those poses are then used in two easy-to-follow workouts: Rodney’s “energizing” program and Colleen’s “rejuvenating” program. Besides the normal, full-instruction audio track, you get two additional options. “Pose only” avoids distractions with limited cuing, while “inspirational” focuses on your mental attitude (e.g. mountain pose: “think about a strong, steady, majestic mountain”). Filmed in a beautiful Oceanside setting. www.CollageVideo.com
  7. Michelle Dozols Peak 10 Cardio Strength. $19.95. A well-structured aero/tone interval workout that features four different techniques and intensity levels. It’s all carefully sequenced to keep your heart rate elevated while you build lean muscle. Each ten-minute circuit progresses from toning to aerobics (and back again). The beginning interval is “base” – simple strength training. “Ascent” is next; it uses more advanced toning exercises. Then it’s “climb” — a challenging blend of multi-muscle toning and mixed-impact aerobics. The circuit ends with “peak” — 15 seconds of full-on, high-impact cardio (e.g. “scissor jumps,” “frog jumps”). Superb production and excellent cuing. Requires two sets of dumbbells (e.g. 3 lb and 5 lb). www.CollageVideo.com.
  8. Kelly Coffey’s 30 Minutes to Fitness Circuit Burn. $14.95. An intelligently sequenced aero/tone interval program that features four exercise types. It’s all carefully designed to burn calories as it tones your body. You get two different circuits. Each uses a consistent four-segment format: athletic cardio, multi-muscle body-sculpting, shadow boxing aerobics and lower-body toning. You’ll do each circuit twice. The second series is longer and more challenging (it also lets you use heavier weights). Kelly’s cuing is always easy-to-follow, but the workout and transitions are fast — you’ll need to pay attention. Has a bonus 6-minute ab section. Requires two sets of dumbbells (e.g. 3 lb. and 10 lb). www.CollageVideo.com

10. Jillian Michaels’ Banish Fat, Boost Metabolism. $14.95. A no nonsense series of easy-to-follow aero/tone intervals led by “The Biggest Loser” trainer. As always, Jillian is definitely “forceful,” but she’s also surprisingly supportive (she really wants you to succeed). The cardio segments feature non-dancy, athletic moves like kickboxing, callisthenic jacks and plyometric jumps. The core-focused body-sculpting includes both standing and floor moves. Jillian skillfully alternates upper and lower-body exercises to keep your heart rate elevated and your blood pumping. For maximum results, each circuit is done once, then repeated at a slightly higher intensity (“with intention”).  www.CollageVideo.com

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 12 grandchildren.    

 

 

Fitness DVDs Make a Great Christmas Gift

By Barbara Day, M.S, R.D., C.N.

          With the economy the way it is, some people may not be able to belong to a fitness center. Fitness DVDs are inexpensive and can be very motivational. Below are ten DVDs that got4- 5 star ratings. The P90X videos are by far the most complete but are also the most expensive. You will need a pull up bar. Many of the DVDs require that you purchase at least 2 sets of dumbbells

P90X. $119 plus $9.95 for shipping and handling. In just 90 days, you can get back in shape, or build the body you’ve always wanted. All you need is a set of dumbbells or resistance bands, a pull-up bar, and about an hour a day. No gym membership required. You get 12 DVDs. All you need is a small space (about 6 by 6 feet), a set of dumbbells or resistance bands, a pull-up bar, and about an hour a day.  Two of my sons and a bunch of my friends use this program and everyone seems to get great results! It’s expensive but worth it according to my family and friends. http://www.extremefitnessplans.com/Tony_Horton/P90X_Extreme_Training_System.html

A.S.A.P. Hollywood Bootcamp 4X4. $19.95. If you want to participate in a boot camp but don’t want to get up with the roosters, try a boot camp video. This video is a fast paced series of 60-second intervals: aerobics, lower-body toning, upper-body toning and corework. Each non-stop segment challenges the body in different ways. Requires 3 to 10 lb dumbbells. www.CollageVideo.com.

Dance Off Inches Line Dance Party or Dance Off the Inches: Sizzling Salsa. Both DVDs are $14.95. The Line Dance Party has 10 simple moves from three traditional dances. The Salsa DVD has three routines that get the hips moving & heart rate souring. www.CollageVideo.com.

Hi/Lo Extreme. $16.95. This is a fast-paced and super-challenging, it’s an ever-changing mix of non-stop cardio combos. You’re sure to burn fat, build stamina … and test your endurance. The exercises include pivots, repeaters and directional changes plus higher-impact ski jumps, power leaps and football-style plyo drills (the last combo is nearly all high-impact, but one person shows an easier variation). www.CollageVideo.com.

Trudie Styler’s Core Strength Pilates. $14.95. A balanced blend of Pilates and stretch with a clear focus on breath cycles (e.g. “on the out-breath, open the body; on the in-breath, bring the body together”). This varied combination of techniques and styles builds strength as it improves flexibility and maximizes relaxation. The toning exercises are familiar Pilates classics while the yoga-based stretch elements include moves like cobra and down dog. The instruction is exceptionally detailed and purposeful. www.CollageVideo.com

Get Extremely Ripped 1,000 with Jari Love. $14.95. An ultra-challenging aero/tone interval program with athletic-style cardio and lots of compound muscle toning. The three-minute, high-impact cardio drills range from L-steps and speed skates to L-hops and jumping jacks (as floor aerobics, they’re tough, but one group even does them using a step). The shorter toning intervals maximize results by working multiple muscles at once. They include a mix of weight-room, compound-muscle and balance exercises. Motivating countdown timer and tribal/drum soundtrack. Requires two sets of dumbbells. www.CollageVideo.com

Rodney Yee Yoga for Beginners. $14.95. This video is a two-workout DVD which features — a superb tutorial and a choice of audio tracks. Rodney and Colleen Saidman show you the exact positions and movements for 20 classic yoga poses. Those poses are then used in two easy-to-follow workouts: Rodney’s “energizing” program and Colleen’s “rejuvenating” program. Besides the normal, full-instruction audio track, you get two additional options. “Pose only” avoids distractions with limited cuing, while “inspirational” focuses on your mental attitude (e.g. mountain pose: “think about a strong, steady, majestic mountain”). Filmed in a beautiful Oceanside setting. www.CollageVideo.com

Michelle Dozols Peak 10 Cardio Strength. $19.95. A well-structured aero/tone interval workout that features four different techniques and intensity levels. It’s all carefully sequenced to keep your heart rate elevated while you build lean muscle. Each ten-minute circuit progresses from toning to aerobics (and back again). The beginning interval is “base” – simple strength training. “Ascent” is next; it uses more advanced toning exercises. Then it’s “climb” — a challenging blend of multi-muscle toning and mixed-impact aerobics. The circuit ends with “peak” — 15 seconds of full-on, high-impact cardio (e.g. “scissor jumps,” “frog jumps”). Superb production and excellent cuing. Requires two sets of dumbbells (e.g. 3 lb and 5 lb). www.CollageVideo.com.

Kelly Coffey’s 30 Minutes to Fitness Circuit Burn. $14.95. An intelligently sequenced aero/tone interval program that features four exercise types. It’s all carefully designed to burn calories as it tones your body. You get two different circuits. Each uses a consistent four-segment format: athletic cardio, multi-muscle body-sculpting, shadow boxing aerobics and lower-body toning. You’ll do each circuit twice. The second series is longer and more challenging (it also lets you use heavier weights). Kelly’s cuing is always easy-to-follow, but the workout and transitions are fast — you’ll need to pay attention. Has a bonus 6-minute ab section. Requires two sets of dumbbells (e.g. 3 lb. and 10 lb). www.CollageVideo.com

Jillian Michaels’ Banish Fat, Boost Metabolism. $14.95. A no nonsense series of easy-to-follow aero/tone intervals led by “The Biggest Loser” trainer. As always, Jillian is definitely “forceful,” but she’s also surprisingly supportive (she really wants you to succeed). The cardio segments feature non-dancy, athletic moves like kickboxing, callisthenic jacks and plyometric jumps. The core-focused body-sculpting includes both standing and floor moves. Jillian skillfully alternates upper and lower-body exercises to keep your heart rate elevated and your blood pumping. For maximum results, each circuit is done once, then repeated at a slightly higher intensity (“with intention”).  www.CollageVideo.com 

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

 

 

Christmas Gifts & Gadgets for You’re Cycling Enthusiast

By Jesse Roberson

Garmin Edge 800

The Garmin Edge 800 is one of the best gadgets made for cycling and running.  This versatile computer has tools for any cyclist, touring or training.  One of those tools is the ability to download any workout to your computer.  You can even play your workouts back and watch what your ride on your computer screen.  Records 30 different statistics including GPS route mapping, temperature, and heart rate analysis, this cell phone size computer will put a smile on anyone’s face. Give a Garmin this Christmas

DeFeet Socks

Socks are a great gift, especially for running and cycling enthusiasts. DeFeet socks are the best.  The fit and performance of these socks are second to none.  They are the original airflow design sock; this means that when you’re working out, your feet stay comfortable due to better breath ability.  In a low cut, virtually seamless design, they will withstand any abuse.  Keep feet happy, check out DeFeet.

Trainers

A good bike ride can put a smile on any face young and old.  If that certain someone likes to ride their bike, the cold nasty weather limits the release of cycling related endorphins, causing wintertime grumpiness.  Solve this common issue with an indoor trainer.  Take an existing bicycle and ride it inside, on an indoor trainer.  Create a weatherproof workout and put a smile back on their face.  Trainers are extremely popular, and easy to transport.  Get rid of a grumpy attitude and get more time on a bike with an indoor trainer.

Book of Rides

Kentuckiana residents will benefit from one of the best cycling guides published. A local in theLouisvillecommunity, Joe Ward, has written “Wheeling Around Louisville,” a book of rides that take you an a trip through the country seeing the sights.  This book show over 50 different bike rides around the Kentuckiana area.  Everyone who likes to ride will love a resource for a new ride, great for runners too as they will show you many of the quieter roads to use on the next outing.

Bikase® Cell Phone Bike Holder

Bikase® fits most smartphones like I-Phone®, Blackberry®, and Droid®. Because Bikase® is covered by a plastic cover, your phone is protected in case of rain and the holder can be wiped off for cleaning.  The website, www.bikase.com, says the holder is water and shock resistant.

Gift Certificates

A Gift Certificate is always a great gift; almost any store will sell you gift certificates.  Some stores have gift cards that don’t expire like many gift certificates, and can be used at any company store, I prefer these as you don’t create a special trip to a single location for your recipient.  You can’t go wrong with the gift of a gift card.

 

Jesse Roberson has worked in the cycling industry for 16 years and is the manager of the Middletown branch of Scheller’s Fitness & Cycling.  He holds an accounting degree from Central Michigan University. An avid cyclist for more than half his life, Jesse rides competitively in regional road, mountain and cyclocross events. For more information go to www.schellers.com.

 

 

Indoor Cycling Trainers

By Jesse Roberson

Welcome back cold weather!  It is always refreshing to revisit the cold months each year.  Why you might ask? The cold months are when you get the best use of indoor cycling trainers.  Cycling trainers are a great way to ride at your own pace, get some time on the bike regardless of weather, and not have to deal with the change in daylight hours.  Trainers are just a fraction of the cost to new fitness equipment, and you can get a workout that is top grade.  Your workout couldn’t be easier or more affordable.  Pop in a Spinning DVD or just a movie and pedal away.  Trainers are lots of fun, easy to use, and compatible with almost every bicycle made.  Road bike, mountain bike, hybrid bike, recumbent bike, they all work.  Check out the following trainers from CycleOps:

Supermagneto Pro Trainer – Versatility with a Authentic Road Like Feel – $399.99

  • Power curve for every rider type and ride type in one trainer.
  • Flexible Power Curve Technology lets you adjust resistance curves.
  • Easily adjusted for ride or rider type.
  • Features Pro Series frame

JetFluid Pro Trainer – Road like Performance.  Pure and Simple – $379.99

  • Powertuned technology provides smooth, realistic accelerations and inertia.
  • Cooler operating temperature delivers long-lasting performance and stable progressive power.
  • Pro Series frame offers quick installation and removal of bike.
  • Features Pro Series frame.

Fluid2 Trainer – The power’s in you. Unleash it – $339.99

  • New larger flywheel for improved road-like feel.
  • Infinite resistance curve
  • Self-cooling mechanisms, including a patented fan design, keep the unit performing better, longer.
  • Cam-Lever tightens resistance unit with one movement.
  • Exclusive Power Band technology offers the widest resistance range without ever touching the unit.

Magneto Trainer – Stay strong all year long – $279.99

  • The world’s first and only mag trainer with progressive resistance.
  • Exclusive Power Band Technology gives you access to a wide resistance range – from easy spins to    lung-burning climbs – without ever touching the unit.
  • Cam-Lever tightens resistance unit with one movement.

Mag / Mag+ Trainer – $189.99/$209.99

  • New 5-position adjustment makes it easy to vary your workouts.
  • Redesigned to deliver even more resistance.
  • Training DVD included (US only).
  • Mag+ includes a bar-mounted remote shifter.

Image from: www.bicylcetrainer.org

 

Jesse Roberson has worked in the cycling industry for 16 years and is the manager of the Middletown branch of Scheller’s Fitness & Cycling.  He holds an accounting degree from Central Michigan University. An avid cyclist for more than half his life, Jesse rides competitively in regional road, mountain and cyclocross events. For more information go to www.schellers.com.

 

 

Choosing an Analgesic: What a Pain!

By Amber Dale Sapp, PharmD, RPh

 Undoubtedly, you’ve been there.  After a day of overdoing it at the gym (what with that New Year’s resolution to become more fit), you stare blankly at the analgesic shelf at your pharmacy, confounded by the seemingly indistinguishable choices for pain relief.  Television and print advertisements further confuse the issue by promising faster, stronger, safer pain relief.  Each product claims to be preferred by doctors, recommended by pharmacists, and tested by moms.  So, what really is the difference in the many over-the-counter anti-inflammatory and pain reliever medications?  You will be relieved at the simple answer: not much.

It may be helpful to get an overview of the classes of pain relievers currently on the market.  First are the salicylates, namely aspirin preparations.  Aspirin is found in many products—Bayer, Bufferin, and Excedrin, to list a few.  Acetaminophen is the second OTC analgesic, and can be found in the Tylenol brand.  Third, and most diverse, are the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs.  The only three OTC medications in the NSAID class are ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and naproxen.  Finally, glucosamine products offer an alternative to anti-inflammatory agents for treatment of arthritis-related pain.

Aspirin works by blocking pain-mediating and inflammatory chemicals in the nervous system. Aspirin also blocks platelet aggregation in the blood stream.  (Platelets are one component of blood clots.)  As such, doctors now recommend some patients take an aspirin tablet daily to reduce risk of strokes and heart attacks.  Studies have shown that low-dose aspirin therapy (81 mg per day) is no more effective in most cases in reducing heart attack risk than a full-strength tablet (325 mg).  Aspirin is an acidic chemical, and it can wear away the stomach lining.  Over time, a bleeding ulcer could result.  This effect may be diminished, but not eliminated, by taking an enteric-coated product.  Additionally, because of the risk of Reye’s syndrome, parents should never give any salicylate to a child under eighteen years of age that has a fever.  With regards to analgesia, aspirin’s risks generally outweigh its efficacy.  Clinicians now rarely recommend aspirin for pain relief.

Acetaminophen is a common ingredient in many OTC products.  It works in a similar manner as aspirin, but has no anti-inflammatory properties.  It is a mainstay for reducing fever and treating mild headaches. Acetaminophen can be safely used for pain-relief in patients who are at risk for ulcers, who are prone to bleeding disorders, or who are allergic to salicylates.  That is not to stay that acetaminophen is without risk. An average-sized adult should not exceed 4000mg of the drug per day.  To do so puts the patient at risk for liver failure.  People with liver diseases (hepatitis, cirrhosis), as well as active alcoholism, are even more at risk for acetaminophen overdose.  A typical adult dose for short-term pain relief is 325-500 milligrams every 4-6 hours, without regard to meals.

The third, and most popular class of OTC analgesics are the NSAIDs.  This type of drug works by inhibiting generation of pain impulses at the site of injury.  NSAIDs also work to reduce inflammation.  Sports injuries, osteoarthritis, and muscle aches are all the result of inflammation.  Ibuprofen is the active ingredient of the Motrin and Advil brands.  The only OTC strength available is 200 mg per tablet.  A normal adult dose of ibuprofen is 200-400 milligrams every 4-6 hours (maximum 3200 mg per day).  Naproxen, or Aleve brand, has the benefit of a longer duration of action.  A 220 milligram tablet need only be taken every 8-12 hours (daily maximum of 1100 mg).  Ketoprofen, found in Orudis KT, is a slightly more expensive NSAID, but it offers no therapeutic benefit over others in its class.  Ketoprofen is usually taken as 12.5 milligrams every 4-6 hours (maximum of 300 mg per day).  People respond to this drug class in very diverse ways.  If ibuprofen does not provide full relief of pain, it is likely that another in that class will be effective.  Similar to aspirin, NSAIDs can wear away stomach lining, and should always be taken with food.  Moreover, NSAIDs do interact with many over-the-counter and prescription medications so it is wise to consult your pharmacist before starting self-treatment.

Of late, a lot of press has been given to glucosamine as treatment for the pain associated with osteoarthritis.  Arthritis is a condition wherein the lining of our joints (cartilage) wears away with age, leaving little or no padding for movement. New research suggests that glucosamine supplements might slow the progression of osteoarthritis.  This product is thought to stimulate cartilage growth, rebuilding that protective padding in the joints.  There is more study needed, but it seems to work as well as ibuprofen for arthritis pain.  The recommended dose is 1500 mg per day.  However, this regimen may require 4 to 8 weeks to relieve pain.  An NSAID may by continued for the first month or two when beginning glucosamine therapy.  As an aside, clinicians have noted that some diabetic patients experience more difficult blood sugar control while taking glucosamine.  Ask your doctor or pharmacist if this is something about which you should be concerned.  Finally, many products, like Cosamin and Bioflex, will try to lure you with additives like chondroitin and MSM.  There is absolutely no proof these products work any better than glucosamine alone.

As you make good on that resolution to become healthier, you will no doubt experience aches and pains related to your new regimen.  Before you return to your pharmacy’s analgesic shelf, make another resolution to be more informed about what awaits you there.

Image from: www.topnews.net.nz

Dr. Amber Dale Sapp is a pharmacist in LaGrange.  She received a doctorate in pharmacy from the University of Kentucky in 2000. Her professional areas of interest include chemical dependency and working with deaf patients using American Sign Language.  She can be reached at ambersapp@bellsouth.net.

 

CALLING ALL TARZAN WANNABES

By Kirby Adams

Life becomes a little too predictable?  Need to add some spark and sizzle to your routine?  Give yourself a thrill and spend a couple of hours ZIPPING through the Mega Cavern.

Sailing through the air tethered to a steel cable has soared in popularity the past few years. While most commercial zipline adventures are located at vacation destinations, you can now Zip in the comfort of your own hometown.

A quick drive over the Mega Caverns located just off Popular Level road near the Watterson Expressway and I was soon suited up in $700 worth of safety equipment.  Two Zip guides are assigned to my group of 8 and together they check and double check that my  harness, helmet, headlamp, and not one but two safety lines are attached correctly before we are off to  the wimpy Bunny Zip.

For those who are anxious about heights the designers have given you a break by making the first of the 6 rides a very short (as in length) and very low (as in Height) ride.

Like Roller coaster fanatics who travel the world daring themselves to ride the world’s fastest, highest, most unusual coasters. The Mega Cavern’s Mega Zips is the world’s ONLY underground zipline.  A fact that is already attracting Zip-aficionados from around the world.

With the Bunny Zip under my belt we are shuttled deeper into the 100 acre limestone quarry.  Opened in early July, the zip-line tour includes five underground zip lines (remember the Bunny zip was just to “get our feet wet” so to speak) and three suspension bridges.

Each Line has its own name and distinct characteristic.  For instance, once the “test” Bunny Zip is out of the way our next ride is substantially longer, higher, and through a canyon of Fire (well, actually  flickering red lights and blowing silk)!  This is the The Zip to Hell which is followed by The Cross Canyon Zip which I would describe as long, dark, and bouncy.

Our guides are great. Knowledgeable not only about Zip Line safety but the history of the Cavern (quarry).  They take great care in chatting with those who are nervous, checking re checking and checking again all safety equipment before each ride, ensuring the 2 hour experience is a controlled thrill we will all remember.

I should mention there are also Challenge Bridges (suspension bridges) which seemed more ominous to some in our group than the ziplines.  I can only figure that once the Zipline begins you are moving thanks to gravity and the only way you stop is thanks to gravity and the guide who is standing on the other side to catch you.  The Challenge Bridges force you to move your body yourself and for some that can be a tough mental exercise.  Still I think all would agree that the Challenge was reward in itself.  Once safely to the opposite side you feel a true sense of accomplishment.

The Ziplines get longer and darker and if you are lucky enough to be on a trip with 4 guides you can even race your fellow Zippers on the final line.

Do I recommend this hometown adventure?  I do.  I give it Two Headlamps out of Two.  I also recommend that you call ahead and make a reservation.  If you get there and have to wait, you just might chicken out.  That would be too bad because this is an experience you will always remember and love to talk about.

So put a little Zip into your day and check it out at http://www.louisvillemegacavern.com

 

Kirby Adams is an award winning journalist who has spent a lot of time flying, falling, and zipping through the air.  She has reported on Para sailing, sky diving, bungee jumping, and Para skiing (snow skiing with a parachute).  If you have a challenge you’d like her to report on contact Kirby at KIRBYADAMSLOUISVILLE@gmail.com

 

 

 

Home Fitness Options on a Fixed Budget

By Mike Everette

Falling leaves, crisp air and that little shiver when your feet first hit the floor in the morning are sure signs that winter is on it’s way.  As the night comes more quickly and the frost gets more bite a lot of people begin to alter their fitness strategy as spending time outside or traveling to and from the gym becomes a little less appealing.

With these changes often come questions:  Isn’t home fitness equipment expensive?  Do I really have enough room to workout at home?

The answers to these questions are not difficult.  The key is establishing a budget for both money and space.  The facts are that home equipment is as expensive and expansive as you want it to be.   As we all are a little more price conscious these days lets focus on some options available for those with a tighter budget and allow you to mix and match where you please.

 

Option #1

Powerblock, the makers of the first “selectorized” dumbbell, have been making high quality products since 1993 and their focus has always been on value and space.  The FB90 bench/stand combo combined with a pair of Powerblock Sport 5.0 dumbbells makes up the most space friendly and budget savvy strength workout available.  The bench and dumbbell stand are one unit with the stand placed directly in front of the bench so that the bench can be folded up vertically for storage.  The placement of the stand also makes it easier to adjust the weight you are lifting and begin your workout as you simply pick up the dumbbells and rock back onto the bench.  The Sport 5.0 dumbbells range from 5# through 50# and can be expanded to 65# with the purchase of an additional set of handles.  Powerblock even has a workout video section online so you can learn how to perform all of the exercises you need to target specific muscle groups.   This system requires less than a 3’ X 3’ area when folded and only 29” X 71” in its usable position.  With a retail price of $648 it is easily the best value in strength training.

For a complete cardio and strength workout add the Schwinn Airdyne to your package and you will have perhaps the best workout in the smallest footprint available anywhere.  The Airdyne exercise bike has a proven record of over 3 decades of fantastic results in a compact, comprehensive, total body cardio workout.  At just 3’ X 5’ and $749, this machine is still one of the best values in the fitness industry today.

The Powerblock and Airdyne package will cost you less than $1500 and requires less space than a queen size bed while providing you all of the variety you need to keep you engaged in your workout throughout the foul weather months.

 

Option #2

If running is more your speed and you’re interested in a more rigorous core workout then you might want to consider the Powerblocks, substituting the bench for a Thera-ball, and a 2.0AT treadmill from AFG.  The 2.0AT ($1299) is a folding treadmill with a heavy steel frame that supports up to a 325# user while offering an adequately sized motor and belt to make the machine comfortable for walking or jogging.  With a great mix of program options including Heart Rate Control, 2 Custom programs, and hill and speed intervals almost any user can stay motivated.  Factor in the Lifetime Motor and 3 year parts warranty the 2.0AT will serve customers looking for a durable and affordable treadmill very well.

By substituting the Thera-ball for a bench you dramatically increase the intensity of your strength workout as your core muscles (think legs, abdominals, lower back, and hips) are much more active when sitting or laying on the ball to perform exercises for the arms, shoulders, chest and back.  You can also find the ball to be an excellent option to aid in stretching and flexibility training.

A package including the AFG 2.0AT treadmill, Powerblock Sport 5.0, and a Thera-ball will require less space than the average sleeper sofa and would sell for less than $1700.

Option #3

For the folks who are hardcore enough to walk, run, or ride outdoors no matter the temperature but who want to add some strength training to their regimen they should the AFG 2.0AS home gym.  The 2.0AS is a functional strength trainer that provides all of the convenience of a traditional weight stack and cable machine but with the versatility of a “free weight” movement.  By using cable motion handles the user can determine how they want their arms to move for all of the key upper body exercises for better fit and results.  Because the machine uses a single 150# weight stack, 75# for each arm, an exercise flip-chart for beginners, and  easy pop-pin adjustments the machine will accommodate a wide range of users.  At $1599 and just 4’ X 7’ this machine will provide a great all around workout in a very compact and versatile package.

So as winter draws near don’t feel like your only option is to stay inside and pile on your “polar bear suit” before hibernating this winter.  You have a variety of options from strength training for $650 to complete cardiovascular and strength packages at around $1700.   Your body will thank you when the weather breaks and it’s time hit the road, the trail or the gym again.

Mike Everette is the Purchasing Manager for Scheller’s Fitness & Cycling on Preston Hwy.  He has worked in the fitness, cycling, and outdoor sports industry for 17 years.  He can be reached at meverette@schellers.com or at 502-969-4100. 

 

 

 

 

Pump n’ Pedal: Getting Two for the Price of One

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I’ve been going to spinning classes for about 10 years. I have to admit, I am more of a lover of aerobic exercise rather than weight training. Yes, I do weight train but I need to force myself to do it. Yeah, yeah, I know I should know better as a health professional but…I am just telling you the truth.

I typically run and bike outdoors but in the winter I like to go to spinning classes rather than bike in the cold. When I saw the class called Pump n’ Pedal on the schedule, I couldn’t wait to take the class. The class definition is: cycling with resistance training combined in one session – what more could you ask for?

The instructor, Nancy Moody, was excellent! Seeing her was like a blast from the past! About 8 years ago, Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, one of the magazines I used to publish, did a feature story on her. Nancy, a very fit and health conscious woman all of her life, found out she had colon cancer. Now, she boasts she has been cancer free for 10 years & counting. She looked great & her encouragement during the class & her music was exceptional.

Nancy brought in a cart which was loaded with an assortment of bands of all colors and hand-held weights from 5 pounds to 10 pounds. After class participants picked up their tubes and weights, we mounted our bikes & the fun began (and work). The class was 75 minutes.

After 30 minutes of spinning, we got off the bike and used exercise tubing to work the muscles in our shoulders and arms. I had a band that the level of difficulty was too high for me so I struggled.  Mental note: Bring my own tubing for the next class. Back on the bike, more spinning then back to more, then off the bike again for more resistance training with the bands. Back on the bike, more spinning then off the bike using hand held weight. We did some exercises on the bike which help to strengthen our abs but no actual crunches were part of the workout.

I always wear my heart rate monitor when I exercise. It’s very rewarding for me to hit a button and discover I burned 650 calories during the class. Yippee!

The question I have right now is Will I be able to walk or run tomorrow or Wednesday or Will I be able to even lift my arms over my head. I’ll let you know in 2 days or so, that’s when the soreness really sets in!

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.

 

 

Sprained Ankles, Sprained Wrists, Plague Athletes But Help in on the Way!

Sprained Ankles, Sprained Wrists, Plague Athletes But Help in on the Way!

Try the Arctic Ease Cryotherapy Wraps or Pads!

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I went to pick up my race number for the Derby Festival miniMarathon Thursday.   I spent a few minutes looking the exhibits at the Expo. What I found was an interesting new product called Arctic Ease. As an athlete, I have had every injury in the book: sprained and broken ankles, sprained and broken wrists, shoulder pain, foot pain, knee pain, back pain, pulled groin muscle, you name it, I have had it. Most of the pain and swelling from these musculoskeletal injuries would have been greatly decreased at the point of impact if I had had some ice readily available. But when you are out running or riding a bike, you typically don’t carry ice with you. But Arctic Ease might be just what the doctored ordered.

What is an Arctic Ease?

Arctic Ease is a specially treated cryotherapy wrap or pad which absorbs heat energy from your body to cool the covered area and can be wrapped around the injured area. It easily conforms to the injury and requires no tape or clips. According to the product information, “the absorbed heat is then lost to evaporation, which allows for the sustained cooling effect of Arctic Ease.”   According to their product information, Arctic Ease stays cold for 4 to 6 hours. It comes in a ready-to-use right-out-of –the –pouch package.

No refrigeration is needed and the fact that it is reusable makes Arctic Ease cost effective. All you have to do is add 1 to 2 tablespoons of water and reseal the bag. It takes about 2 – 3 hours to rehydrate.

If needed, Arctic Ease can actually be worn during exercise. Arctic Ease is odorless, contains no latex or adhesive, and is also eco-friendly. It’s convenient in that you could stuff it in a runner’s belt or bike pouch, ready to use when needed. Hey, this strategy might be like taking an umbrella with you to prevent it from raining!  If you have active kids, you may want to stuff one of these wraps in your car, just in case!

You can get one 4” X 60” online at www.arcticease.com ($12.29) www.amazon.com ($16.64), www.walgreens.com ($11.49) or www.cvs.com ($12.99). The pads sell for a pack of three 4” X 6” pads ($8.79) at www.arcticease.com.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.