Are There Specific Spices that Help Prevent Disease?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Yes. I could write a book about this topic but here’s the short version. Some spices contain important antioxidants properties. An antioxidant helps to prevent free radicals oxidative damage which can cause cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity and autoimmune diseases. Spices that may help prevent cancer: garlic, ginger, turmeric, rosemary, etc. Spices that may help prevent heart disease: cinnamon, garlic, ginger, oregano, thyme, etc. Spices that may help control diabetes: cinnamon, garlic, ginger, fenugreek, coriander, etc. Cinnamon helps to increase insulin sensitivity which may be effective in treating Type II Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome.  Spices that may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease: turmeric, rosemary, ginger, garlic. Spices that may influence obesity: chilies, garlic, fenugreek. Spices that may help control autoimmune diseases: bay leaf, black pepper, garlic, ginger, green tea, oregano, rosemary, thyme, turmeric. Superstar spices include: cinnamon, garlic, turmeric, and ginger.  I am a post menopausal woman. My physician suggested I use ½ teaspoon of cinnamon per day. Always check with your physician if you plan to use large doses of spices in a prophylactic manner.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.     

What’s a Healthy Hometown Restaurant?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

          Years ago when I first moved back to Louisville, the American Heart Association (AHA) had a program where a consultant dietitian would analyze restaurant recipes & add a little icon if the menu item met the AHA’s guidelines. Since that time, there are more fast food restaurants and sit down restaurants because more and more people are eating out. With both mom and dad is the work force, eating out has become a way of life. The more people tend to eat out, the more calories they consumer. Fast forward today.

Our very own Metro Health & Wellness Department has secured a taxpayer funded obesity prevention grant for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service. This grant allowed for the launch of a new initiative to alert consumers on the number of calorie in the food they are eating at Louisville area restaurants.

The Affordable Care Act requires, in 2014, that all restaurants with 20 or more locations must add calorie content directly on the restaurant’s menu or menu boards.  It also requires restaurants to make readily available nutritional information of their products such as fats, carbohydrates and sodium content. Many of these restaurants have already posted the nutritional information online but the thought is that most consumers don’t check the information online so mandating calories information right on the menu or menu boards will empower consumers to make smarter choices when eating. That remains to be scene. In New York City, calories were mandated to be added to menu boards several years ago but preliminary data suggests it has not made a difference in choice.

Local restaurant owners with fewer than 20 locations can receive technical assistance from chefs and dietitians to calculate calories in recipes served at their restaurant as well as receive consultation to help them develop healthier recipes. The grant also pays for the printing of new menus and menu boards as well as pays for marketing to let consumers know that they are participating in this new program.  Participating restaurants can display their Healthy Hometown Restaurant logo to alert consumers their menu/menu boards contain the calorie information.

How to Become a Healthy Hometown Restaurant?

Here are the requirements: 1. Must agree to display the number of calories per standard menu item on menu, menu boards and drive thru board. 2. Applies to standard menu items, including beverages offered for sale at least 60 days per calendar year. 3. Does not include condiments, daily specials, custom orders, and customary test marketing items which are on the menu less than 90 days. 4. Succinct statement concerning suggested daily caloric intake “Recommended limits for a 2000 calorie daily diet are 20 grams of saturated fat and 2,300 milligrams of sodium” which is located at the bottom right hand corner.”  5. Display a statement regarding the availability of additional nutrition information; Additional written information available upon request which includes- calories, calories from fat, total fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, sugars, dietary fibers, and protein.     

Healthy Hometown Participating Restaurants List

Here’s the list: 60 West Bistro & Martini Bar, Annie’s Pizza, Bristol Bar & Grille, Cycler’s Café, The Café, City Café, J. Gumbo’s, Joe’s Older Than Dirt, Life Bar, Lonnie’s Best Taste of Chicago, Morel’s, Morris’s Deli, Nancy’s Bagel Ground, Queenie’s Soul Cuisine, Ramsi’s, Shiraz, Smoothie Q, Soupy’s, Yang Kee Noodle, Zen Garden, Zen Tea House. (www.louisvilleky.gov/Health/PuttingPreventiontoWork/HHRestaurantList.htm).

The Pros and Cons of the Healthy Hometown Restaurant

One of the limitations of the Healthy Hometown Restaurant initiative is the way the recipes are analyzed.  As a dietitian who helped to test the nation’s first computerized food analysis program when I was working in research, your analysis is only as good as the information you are given. For example, if your recipe includes ground beef there is 75% lean, 85% lean, 96% lean. If the restaurant says they use 96% lean but they really use 75% lean ground beef the calories, fat, saturated fat can be dramatically higher. Recipes analyzed by a certified laboratory costs about $600 – $800 per recipe.

 

Check out Yang Kee Noodle at Oxmoor Mall

One of my favorite places to eat is Yang Kee Noodle located at Oxmoor Mall. They participated in the Healthy Hometown Restaurant.  Their menu board and to go menu have the calories added to their normal menu choices. Dan Huckstein, one of the owners, said their customers are very appreciative of having the information based on their positives responses although he’s not sure if they have changed their choice based on the calories on the menu board. I typically order a specialty item called the Farmer’s Bowl which is made up of stir-fried vegetables. You can choose up to 6, choose rice or noodles and then choose your flavoring. I typically add carrots, broccoli, snap peas, zucchini, peppers, and spinach with a side of brown rice and a sauce which I change up often. The last time I was there one of the customers asked me what item that I had and I walked her through the Farmer’s Bowl option. You can add tofu or meat but have to pay more for the add ons. Although the Farmer’s Bowl was not analyzed, the brown rice contains 216 calories (if I eat the whole order) and I have to calculate in my head the calories in the veggies and the sauce.  You can check out the menu at www.yangkeenoodle.com/menu.php.

How your Favorite Restaurant can become a Healthy Hometown Restaurant?

Since the analysis in taxpayer funded and FREE, if you have a favorite hometown restaurant you want to find out how many calories are in their menu items, you can let the restaurant owner you would like the information.        Restaurants wanting to participate in menu analysis and labeling can contact Patrick Rich at 574.6690 or Patrick.Rich@louisvilleky.gov.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

Cream Cheesy Zucchini Spinach Penne

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

 Here’s a really easy recipe that your kids are sure to love. It’s creamy, cheesy and full of veggies.

 Nutritional Information Per Serving:  310 calories, 14 grams protein, 10 grams of fat,  43 grams of CHO,  5 grams of dietary fiber, 366 mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  20 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes

Serves: Six – 1  1/3 cups each

Ingredients

  • 8 oz  whole wheat penne pasta, uncooked*
  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 1 zucchini, sliced
  • ½ lb sliced fresh mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced or ¼ tsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp flour
  • ¼ tsp each: dried basil, oregano leaves and crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup fat-free reduced sodium chicken broth
  • 4 oz low fat cream cheese, cubed
  • 6 oz baby spinach leaves
  • ¼  cup grated parmesan cheese
  • 1 ½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese, divided

Instructions

Heat over to 375 degrees. Cook pasta according to directions.  Meanwhile, heat oil is a large skillet over medium heat.  Add zucchini, mushrooms, and garlic. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes while stirring often or until zucchini is crisp-tender.  Add flour and seasonings.  Cook and stir for 1 minute.  Stir in broth and cook while stirring for 2 to 3 minutes or until thickened.  Add cream cheese and cook and stir for 2 – 3 minutes or until melted.  Drain pasta and then return to pan.  Add zucchini miture, spinach, Parmesan cheese and ½ the mozzarella cheese.  Mix lightly.  Spoon into a 2-qt. casserole which was sprayed with cooking spray.  Top with the remaining mozzarella cheese. Bake for 10 minutes or until mozzarella cheese in melted.

Shopping List

  • 1  box (16 oz) Whole Wheat Pasta Penne
  • olive oil
  • 1 zucchini
  • fresh mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • dried basil
  • oregano leaves
  • crushed red pepper
  • fat-free reduced sodium chicken broth
  • low fat cream cheese
  • 6 oz baby spinach leaves
  • grated parmesan cheese
  • shredded mozzarella cheese

*You can substitute rigatoni pasta rather than use whole wheat pasta.

Image from: www.kraftfoods.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

Grilled Tri-Color Veggie Hummus Wrap

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N

Here’s an easy recipe that loaded with vegetables. Take advantage of the local Farmers Markets for lots of fresh vegetables.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  317 calories, 8 grams protein, 14 grams of fat,  43 grams of CHO, 7 grams of fiber, 480+ mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes

Serves:  2

 Ingredients

  • 1 medium zucchini, cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 medium yellow squash, cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 medium red bell pepper
  • 1 medium green bell pepper
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup shredded spinach leaves
  • 2 8-inch spinach or whole grain wraps/tortillas
  • 4 tbsp Sabra® Lemon Hummus or Roasted Garlic Hummus*

Instructions

Heat grill. Drizzle squash and peppers with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.  Grill veggies turning frequently until the outer skins of peppers are charred and squash is almost cooked throughout. Remove from the grill and allow to cool.  Peel roasted peppers and remove stem and seeds. Slice into strips. Slice grilled squash thinly on the diagonal. Spread each wrap with 2 tbsp of hummus. Sprinkle evenly with chopped spinach.  Divide grilled veggies in half and arrange evenly over the hummus and spinach.  Roll one end in and tuck both sides while rolling. Carefully squeeze as you roll to keep the shape. Secure with toothpicks. Slice in half on the diagonal.

Shopping List

  • 1 medium zucchini
  • 1 medium yellow squash
  • 1 medium red bell pepper
  • 1 medium green bell pepper
  • olive oil
  • spinach leaves
  • 8-inch spinach or whole grain wraps/tortillas
  • Sabra® Lemon Hummus or Roasted Garlic Hummus

*You can use homemade hummus or any type hummus that you like if you want.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

 

Implementing The Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act: By Improving Milk and Water Requirements in Schools

 

Presented by Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

With schools getting ready for the 2011-12 school year, changes have been made regarding water and milk requirements. Kids may not be getting enough fluid throughout the day so adding more access to water during school lunch.  In addition, the USDA has lowered the amount of fat and calories in the milk choice to include skim or 1% milk only. Flavored milk can still be offered but it must be either skim or 1% milk.

USDA  guidance on improving water and milk requirements to states on:

  1. Making water available during school lunch, and
  2. Offering a variety of milk consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Summary of Changes to the Water Availability during School Lunch Meal Service

  • Free water must be made readily available to children during lunch.
  • Schools are given flexibility in how to implement this change. The memo reads: “For example, schools can offer water pitchers and cups on lunch tables, a water fountain, or a faucet that allows students to fill their own bottles or cups with drinking water.”
  • Water is not considered part of the reimbursable meal. However, reasonable costs from providing water will be considered an allowable cost to the nonprofit food service account.

Summary of Changes to the Nutrition Requirements for Fluid Milk

  • Schools should offer children at least two choices of fluid milk that are either fat-free or low-fat (1 percent).
  • Schools may continue to offer plain or flavored milk as long as they are fat-free or low-fat until the new proposed school meals rule goes into effect.

Implementation

Even though local school districts have until the start of next school year (SY 2011-2012) to comply with the requirements, school officials and food service directors should start to make these changes now. Implementing these changes quickly is key to making the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act a success.

Advocates can support schools in this process by:

  • Working with school wellness councils to raise awareness of these new requirements and the timetable for making changes.
  • Collaborating with community stakeholders and the media to build awareness and excitement about these nutritional improvements.
  • Supporting  education and dialogue for school staff, students, and parents promoting the acceptance and understanding of the health benefits of lower-fat milk and the availability of water.
  • Connecting schools with best practice information on education materials, curriculum, and advice on lessons learned from the implementation of similar requirements.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

Should I buy 100 calorie packets to help me lose weight?

Should I buy 100 calorie packets to help me lose weight?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

When you are trying to lose or maintain weight, knowing how many calories you are eating each day is important. The 100-calorie packets are convenient but expensive. Many of these are junk food. Here’s some 100 calorie food suggestions for you: 29 pistachios, 12 Quaker® Quakes Cheddar Rice Snacks, 40 Rold Gold® Classic Pretzels Sticks, 1 hard boiled egg & 1 slice of Melba Toast, 2 cups of raspberries, 28 grapes, 1 cup blueberries, 45 steamed edamame, ½ red bell pepper dipped in 3 tablespoons of hummus, ½ cup low fat cottage cheese with 5 medium size strawberries, 60 Pepperidge Farm® Whole Wheat Goldfish Crackers, 1 Laughing Cow® Creamy Garlic & Herb Cheese Wedge plus 3 Triscuits®, ½ medium cantaloupe, 15 medium strawberries dipped in ¼ cup Cool Whip® Lite, 1 Healthy Choice® Mocha Fudge Swirl Bar, 1 Skinny Cow® Fat Free Fudge Bar, and 5 Nabisco® Nilla Wafers. Keep in mind, you can burn approximately 100 calories by running 10 minutes or walking about 20 minutes.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.

 

 

Kids: Fuel Like a Champion!

By: Christopher R. Mohr, PhD, RD

Parents often contact me looking for nutrition advice for their child and they all swear their kid is going to get a college scholarship, while even more are going pro!  Sound familiar?  Hopefully it is true, but aside from the training they have, there’s often one component of an overall program that’s missing from making sure they’re successful – learning how to fuel like a champion is important!
Let’s delve a bit into some specific nutrition tips for young athletes.

 

Carbohydrates should absolutely be the cornerstone of anyone’s diet.  The key, is to focus heavily on quality — “think fiber, not carbs!”  There is a huge difference between white bread and whole grain, high fiber bread; a sugar coated cereal and oatmeal; French fries vs. sweet potatoes.  Focus on the quality of the carbohydrates.

 

For example, definitely eat breakfast, but try a whole grain based cereal with some fresh fruit for the nutrients and fiber.  Sandwiches should be made with whole grain bread, rather than their white counterpart.  Snacks can be whole grain crackers with peanut butter, fruit or veggie sticks with peanut butter, etc.  The list can go on.  The focus of carbohydrates should always be on foods that provide a few grams of fiber per serving (exception is milk and yogurt, which are very healthy and carbohydrate based, but provide little, if any fiber).

 

Fruit and vegetables are also a crucial element to a healthy diet.  Kids often shy away from them and parents don’t always push them.  However, research has suggested it can take as many as one dozen times to determine if a child likes a particular food.  The key for a parent is to introduce kids to as many of these nutrient dense, colorful foods as possible!  Make it fun.  Here are a few ideas:

 

  • Ants on a log (celery with natural peanut butter and raisins)
  • Sailboats (apple slices with toothpicks holding a cheddar cheese “sail”— of course watch your child to ensure they don’t eat the toothpick).
  • Homemade trail mix (mixed nuts, dried fruit, and some whole grain cereal)

 

Keep in mind that dried fruit counts towards the total fruit intake for the day, as does 100% juice (of course this shouldn’t be the mainstay, though, as whole fruit provides more fiber), along with fruit puree.

Protein Needs of Young Athletes

 

In the world of athletics, no other macronutrient has received the same level of attention as protein.  Everywhere you look, everything you see, tells us we need more and more protein, whether you’re trying to lose weight or gain muscle.  But how about for adolescent athletes; do they too have higher protein requirements like other fitness enthusiasts?  As you know, they too are trying to improve performance, put some muscles on those bodies, and of course just improve overall health (at least we hope they are!).

 

Of course protein plays a role and a very important one at that!  One important message is to make sure young athletes always focus on food first.  High quality protein sources include:

  • fish and other seafood
  • low or non fat milk or yogurt
  • chicken and turkey breast
  • lean red meat
  • tofu
  • mixed nuts
  • eggs
  • beans
  • natural peanut butter and more.

 

The greater the variety in the diet, the better off they will be getting the most “bang for their buck” in terms of various amino acids and other nutrients.

We need to teach young athletes proper nutrition habits, which should include whole, nutrient dense foods rather than teaching them to immediately turn to supplements, which is common with protein.

 

At the same time, there are quality supplements out there that can be of use.  I would much rather have a teen athlete have a high quality protein shake, blended with some fruit versus a snack like those served at the soccer game I alluded to earlier, or fast food, which is way too common these days.

 

  • Do they need a protein supplement?  No.
  • Will it make them into the next college or pro athlete?  Of course not!
  • Can it be beneficial and a healthier option than many of the alternative high sugar, high fat foods marketed directly towards children?  Absolutely!

 

But food first as whole foods provide more nutrients than any supplement does or ever will be able to provide.

 

Chewing the Fat

 

Fat is another crucial nutrient for children.  The key, like with the other macronutrients, is to focus on quality.  In fact, there have been a handful of scientific studies to even show that one component of omega-3 fats, DHA, is crucial in terms of brain development.  Fat also provides a lot of calories (over double that of protein or carbohydrates), which can be important for very active, young athletes who need more calories than most to develop healthy, strong bodies.

 

Here are a few fats to choose:

  • Fish
  • Whole eggs
  • olive oil
  • Raw mixed nuts
  • Natural peanut butter
  • Avocadoes and more

 

Don’t overdo the fats, but definitely don’t skimp on them either—moderation and quality is king!

 

Fluids

These are actually the most important nutrient anyone can consume.  The quality of the fluid is a struggle for kids in particular; they are surely drinking more fluids, but not the type we’d encourage.  Over the past few decades, milk consumption has decreased dramatically and is being replaced with soft drinks.  This is unfortunate because of the nutrients being lost without the milk and the empty calories they’re being replaced with.  Remember I mentioned earlier that 100% juice does count as fruit; however, we also don’t want kids to live off this, as it doesn’t provide all the same fiber and nutrients whole fruit does, in addition to being way too easy to over consume.  Keep in mind that 4 oz of juice counts as one fruit; this is ½ of a cup of juice.  It would be very easy to drink 2 whole cups of juice, but you are less likely to eat the equivalent 4 whole oranges, meaning it is easy to pack in a lot of excess calories.
Water is really the best option.  The 2005 Dietary Guidelines do in fact make a recommendation to consume at least 3 servings of low-fat milk or other dairy products, and the majority of other fluids should be water.  If you need to make water more exciting for kids, add a squeeze of orange, lemon, lime, or cucumber.  And always keep a pitcher in the refrigerator, so there is cold water at their fingertips.

 

In summary, here are a few tips to keep in mind when fueling young athletes.

 

  • Variety is crucial—the more the variety, the better
  • The more fruits and vegetables each day, the better
  • Think fiber, not carbs
  • Protein is absolutely important, just as it is with adults.
  • Fat quality is crucial
  • Be creative to get kids to eat a variety of foods
  • Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate!
  • Very basic supplements, such as a high quality protein, are OK, within reason, but the food first approach is always the best with folks of all ages.

 

Most important, make sure your child has a chance to try a variety of activities, has fun, and enjoys him/herself.  At 9 or 10 years old, they are not trying out for the majors; they are trying to play and have fun.  Let them be kids, learn some basic skills, and camaraderie; it’s not the Superbowl, World Series, or World Cup!  In the meantime, feed them well and teach them positive nutrition habits that will stay with them for life!  For more information on how to make the best nutrition decisions for young athletes, visit www.FuelLikeaChampion.com

 

Christopher R. Mohr, PhD, RD is the co-owner of Mohr Results, Inc.  He has a PhD in exercise physiology, is a registered dietitian, and board certified sports dietitian.  Visit www.MohrResults.com to learn more about their weight loss seminars in Louisville, DVD’s, and other educational materials!

 

 

New Ideas for Fast & Easy-to-Make Breakfasts for Kids

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.
Kids and adults, too, need to eat breakfast every day. Breakfast means break the fast. Kids will do better in school and parents will do better at work if they eat breakfast. Here’s few easy recipes: Nutty Fruit Breakfast Wrap -1 whole wheat tortilla, ¼ cup low fat vanilla yogurt, ½ cup fresh or frozen fruit like blueberries, ¼ tablespoon of toasted wheat germ (high in folic acid and vitamin E) and 1 tablespoon chopped nuts like walnuts. Fold in sides of tortilla, then roll. 1 serving = 314 calories, 10 grams of protein, 39 grams of carbohydrate, 14 grams of fat, 4 grams of fiber. Crunchy Fruited Yogurt- 1 tablespoon low fat granola, 8 ounces low fat vanilla yogurt, 1 tablespoon nuts like walnuts, ½ cup of fresh or frozen fruit like strawberries. 1 serving = 289 calories, 13 grams of protein, 43 grams of carbohydrate, 8 grams of fat, 3 grams of fiber. Here’s a resource to figure out how many calories your kids need per day. http://www.bcm.edu/cnrc/healthyeatingcalculator/eatingCal.html.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition. The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers. Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues. Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 9 grandchildren.