Avocado Oatmeal Breakfast Cookies*

avocado cookies

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

This recipe contains a number of healthy ingredients which make up a good tasting breakfast cookie for your family who is on the go!

Nutritional Information Per Cookie: 183 calories, 4 grams protein, 5 grams of fat,  31 grams of CHO, 4 grams dietary fiber,  255 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 15 minutes  Bake Time: 35 minutes

Serves:  24 cookies

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of old-fashioned oats
  • 1 ½ cup white whole wheat flour
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 ripe fresh avocado, pitted, peeled, mashed
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups raisins, dried cranberries or pitted & chopped dates (about 12 oz)

*You can add 1 cup of chocolate chips if you must be it will increase the calories but…

Instructions

Heat oven to 375 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with aluminum foil & spray with non-stick cooking spray.  Combine oats, flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon & salt in a medium bowl. Mix.  In a large bowl, cream together oil, avocado & brown sugar.  Stir in yogurt & eggs. Mix well.  Add oat mixture to avocado mixture. Stir until oat mixture in well mixed into the avocado mixture.  Stir in dates.  Use a ¼ cup measuring cup for each cookie & space the cookies 2 inches apart on baking sheet. Bake for 18 to 22 minutes, until golden. Transfer to wire racks & cool completely.

 

Shopping List

  • old-fashioned oats
  • white whole wheat flour
  • baking powder
  • baking soda
  • cinnamon
  • salt
  • 1 ripe fresh avocado
  • brown sugar
  • olive oil
  • plain low-fat yogurt
  • large eggs

 Image from: http://www.avocadocentral.com/

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

Be Wise Portion Size when Eating Out

family_at_diner_200

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

 

Below are a number of strategies to help you make healthier low calorie choices when you are eating out. Be wise and portion size when you are eating out.

Eating Out Strategies:

  1. Go online to see what choices you have available to help you manage your waist.
  2. Be assertive.
  3. Get the Doggie Bag with dinner, split the meal before eating it.
  4. Don’t feel guilty about eating.
  5. Eat slowly and taste every bite.
  6. Eat till you feel full not stuffed!
  7. Concentrate on the atmosphere.
  8. Don’t drink your calories!
  9. Make appetizers the meal.
  10. Breads are fattening but the added butter is.
  11. Salads aren’t always low calorie fare.
  12. Beware of Reduced Calorie salad dressings.
  13. Always ask for your dressing served on the side of the salad.
  14. Vinegar like balsamic, red wine & tarragon, no calories.
  15. Split an Entrée & have an extra salad.
  16. Share a dessert if you must.
  17. Order the luncheon  or Appetizer  Portion

 

Know Menu Terminology

  1. Leaner ways to cook meats & vegetables: broiling, roasting, char grilling, grilling, poaching, stir-frying, boiling & steaming.
  2. Restaurants may brush or baste meats with fats during or after the cooking process.
  3. Some meat may be marinated in oil or a high fat substance.
  4. The term PRIME means very high in fat due to marbling

 

 

Terms that Indicate High-fat, High Calorie Prepared Food

Fried

Pan-fried

Hollandaise

Crispy

Escalloped

Creamed

Creamy

Stewed

In its Own Gravy

Buttery

Casserole

Au Gratin

In a Butter Sauce

Hash

Parmesan

In a Cream Sauce

In a Cheese Sauce

Pot Pie

 

Choose These Foods Lower Calorie Prepared Food

Baked

Barbecued

Blanched

Broiled

Charbroiled

Grilled

Herbs & spices

Marinated

Plank-grilled

Poached

Roasted

Rotisserie

Sauteed

Steamed

Stir -Fried

Tomato Sauce

 

Hamburger Fast Food Green Light Choices

  • Single hamburger or cheeseburger
  • Grilled chicken sandwich
  • Grilled chicken salad
  • Baked potato with chili or broccoli
  • Small order French fries
  • Garden and side salad – use light dressing
  • Frozen yogurt

 

Mexican Green Light Choices

  • Black bean, tortilla soup or gazpacho
  • Mexican or taco salad (don’t eat the fried shell)
  • Arroz con pollo (chicken and rice)
  • Burritos and Enchiladas
  • Fajitas
  • Soft tacos
  • Black or pinto beans (not refried beans with cheese)
  • Mexican rice
  • Pico de gallo
  • All hot sauces

 

Chinese Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Wonton, egg drop or hot & sour soup
  • Teriyaki beef or chicken
  • Chop suey or chow mein
  • Vegetarian stir-fry dishes

Italian Restaurant Green Light Choices

  • Marinated vegetable salad
  • Minestrone soup
  • Shrimp cocktail
  • Pasta with tomato sauce or marinara sauce
  • Chicken or veal cacciatore, light wine or light tomato sauce
  • Chicken or shrimp primavera (no cream in sauce)

American Food Restaurant Green Choices

  • Broth-based soups
  • Chili (hold the cheese and sour cream)
  • Peel and eat shrimp
  • Salad with light or fat free dressing on the side
  • Salad with grilled tuna or chicken
  • Teriyaki or BBQ chicken breast
  • Fajitas

 

 

Applebee’s

Oops!

Fiesta Lime Chicken with Sauce, Cheese, Tortilla Strips, Salsa & Rice

1,285 calories, 47 g fat, 1,443 mg sodium

Grilled Steak Caesar Salad with Toast

1,295 calories, 82 g fat, 2,199 mg sodium

Southwest Philly Roll-Up with Salsa

1,605 calories, 121 g fat, 2,338 mg sodium

Smart Options but…

Grilled Cajun Lime Tilapia with Black Beans & Corn Salsa

310 calories, 6 g fat, 1,250 mg sodium

Crispy Buttermilk Shrimp with Potatoes & Toast

843 calories, 34 g fat, 1,563 mg sodium

Teriyaki Steak & Shrimp Skewers

370 calories, 7 g fat, 1,475 mg sodium

Arby’s

Oops!

Roast Beef & Swiss Market Fresh Sandwich

810 calories, 42 g fat, 1,780 mg sodium

Chicken Salad w/Pecans Sandwich

789 calories, 39 g fat, 1,240 mg sodium

Santa Fe Salad

773 calories, 52 g fat, 1,823 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Grilled Cajun Lime Tilapia with Black Beans & Corn Salsa

440 calories, 19 g fat, 1,061 mg sodium

Chicken Cordon Bleu Sandwich

488 calories, 18 g fat, 1,560 mg sodium

Martha’s Vineyard Salad with Light Buttermilk Dressing

339 calories, 14 g fat, 923 mg sodium

Jimmy John’s

Oops!

Turkey Tom w/Alfalfa Sprouts, Tomatoes, Lettuce, & Mayo

555 calories, 26 g fat, 1,342 mg sodium

Pepe Sub-Ham, Provolone, Lettuce, Tomato, Mayo

684 calories, 37 g fat, 1,659 mg sodium

Gourmet Veggie Club-Provolone, Avocado, Cucumber, Alfalfa, Lettuce, Tomato, Mayo

856 calories, 46 g fat, 1,500 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Turkey Breast Slim Sub w/Alfalfa Sprouts, Tomatoes, Onion, Cucumber & Avocado Spread

426 calories, 2 g fat, 1,439 mg sodium

Totally Tuna Sub

507 calories, 20 g fat, 1,279 mg sodium

Vegetarian Sub w/Avocado Spread, Cucumber, Lettuce, Tomatoes, Alfalfa Sprouts

290 calories, 1.5 g fat, 628 mg sodium

 

Chick-Fil-A

Oops!

Chicken Caesar Cool Wrap

480 calories, 16 g fat, 1,640 mg sodium

Chick-fil-A Chicken Sandwich

420 calories, 16 g fat, 1,300 mg sodium

Chick-fil-A Chick-n Strips Salad with Buttermilk Dressing

800 calories, 60 g fat, 1,745 mg sodium

Chicken, Egg & Cheese on Sunflower Multigrain Bagel

500 calories, 20 g fat, 1,260 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Chick-fil-A Nuggets (8-pack) with Barbecue Sauce

305 calories, 13 g fat, 1,020 mg sodium

Chick-fil-A Southwest Chargrilled Salad with fat-free honey mustard dressing

360 calories, 8 g fat, 1,170 mg sodium

Biscuit & Gravy

330 calories, 15 g fat, 970 mg sodium

Fazzoli’s

Oops!

Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce & Spicy Italian Sausage w/ Caesar Side Salad

1,030 calories, 53.5 g fat, 2,040 mg sodium

Baked Spaghetti with Meatballs

940 calories, 40 g fat, 2,370 sodium

Original Submarine

940 calories, 58 g fat, 3,040 mg sodium

Parmesan Chicken Salad with Ranch Dressing

580 calories, 39 g fat, 1,270 sodium

Oops!

Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce & Spicy Italian Sausage w/ Caesar Side Salad

1,030 calories, 53.5 g fat, 2,040 mg sodium

Baked Spaghetti with Meatballs

940 calories, 40 g fat, 2,370 sodium

Original Submarine

940 calories, 58 g fat, 3,040 mg sodium

Parmesan Chicken Salad with Ranch Dressing

580 calories, 39 g fat, 1,270 sodium

KFC

Oops!

KFC Famous Bowl with Mashed Potatoes & Gravy

740 calories, 35 g fat, 2,350 mg sodium

Popcorn Chicken – Individual

400 calories, 26 g fat, 1,160 mg sodium

Crispy Caesar Salad w/Creamy Parm Caesar Dress w/ Croutons

670 calories, 48 g fat, 1,755 mg sodium

Apple Pie Minis (3)

370 calories, 20 g fat, 260 mg sodium

Smart options but…

3 Crispy Strips, Green Beans, & 3” Corn on Cob

470 calories, 22 g fat, 1,775 mg sodium

Honey BBQ KFC Snacker

210 calories, 3 g fat, 530 mg sodium

Roasted BLT Salad w/Fat Free Ranch Dressing

235 calories, 6 g fat, 1,290 mg sodium

Sweet Life Oatmeal Raisin Cookie

150 calories, 5 g fat, 135 mg sodium

Olive Garden

Oops!

Stuffed Chicken Marsala w/Garlic Parmesan Mash Potatoes

1,315 calories, 86 g fat, 2,550 mg sodium

Mixed Grill w/Vegetables & Mashed Potatoes

839 calories, 43 g fat, 1,541 mg sodium

Pork Filettino w/Potatoes & Bell Peppers

1,011 calories, 57 g fat, 2,479 mg sodium

 

Smart options but…

Linguine Alla Marinara with a Breadstick

691 calories, 9.5 g fat, 1,040 mg sodium

Shrimp Primavera

706 calories, 18 g fat, 1,220 mg sodium

Chicken Giardino

448 calories, 11 g fat, 1,670 mg sodium

 

Outback Steakhouse

Oops!

Ayers Rock Strip Steak w/Sautéed Mushrooms & Loaded Jacket Potato

1,450 calories, 85 g fat

Outback Special (11 oz) w/Sautéed Mushrooms

960 calories, 61 g fat

Half a Bloomin’ Onion

1,155 calories, 67 g fat

Smart options but…

Prime Minister’s Prime Rib w/Fresh Veggies & Sweet Potato

730 calories, 39 g fat

Victoria Filet (9 oz) with Steamed Vegetables

639 calories, 45 g fat

Half an Order of Shrimp on the Barbie w/Bread

330 calories, 21 g fat

PF Chang’s

Oops!

Sriracha Shrimp Salad

1,130 calories, 46 g fat

Salt & Pepper Calamari

770 calories, 50 g fat

Kung Pao Chicken

1,240 calories, 80 g fat

Spicy Green beans

 

Smart options but…

Wild Alaskan Sockeye Steamed with Ginger

750 calories, 50 g fat

Seared Ahi Tuna

260 calories, 6 g fat

Ginger Chicken & Broccoli

660 calories, 26 g fat

Sichuan-Style Asparagus

200 calories, 6 g fat

Quizno’s

Oops!

Small Honey Mustard Chicken Sub

550 calories, 30 g fat, 1,140 mg sodium

Small Prime Rib Cheesesteak

680 calories, 42 g fat, 1,070 mg sodium

Small Turkey Ranch & Swiss Sandwich

450 calories, 22.5 g fat, 1,380 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Small Honey Bourbon Chicken on Wheat Bread

310 calories, 4 g fat, 920 mg sodium

Small Black Angus Sandwich

520 calories, 16.5 g fat, 1,550 mg sodium

Small Tuscan Turkey

390 calories, 14 g fat, 1,185 mg sodium

Red Lobster

Oops!

North Pacific King Crab Legs with Melted Butter w/Rice Pilaf

883 calories, 35 g fat

Snow Crab Legs w/Melted Butter & a Cheddar Bay Biscuit

611 calories, 34.5 g fat

Crab Alfredo

1,170 calories, 66 g fat

Smart options but…

Live Maine Lobster (1.24 lbs) w/Cocktail Sauce & Seasoned Broccoli

288 calories, 3 g fat

Garlic Grilled Jumbo Shrimp

329 calories, 5 g fat

Broiled Flounder w/Lemon Juice & a Garden Salad w/Red Wine Vinaigrette

344 calories, 10 g fat

Romano’s Macaroni Grill

Oops!

Chicken Caesar

920 calories, 69 g fat, 1,660 mg sodium

Chicken Portobello

1,020 calories, 66 g fat, 7,300 mg sodium

Grilled Salmon Teriyaki

1,230 calories, 74 g fat, 6,590 mg sodium

Half Order of Mozzarella Fritta

Smart options but…

½ Pizza Margherita & Caesar Della Casa w/Low Fat Caesar Dr

645 calories, 24 g fat, 1,665 mg sodium

Pollo Magro

330 calories, 5 g fat, 770 mg sodium

Simple Salmon

590 calories, 40 g fat, 1,390 mg sodium

Half Order of Mozzarella Alla Caprese

260 calories, 21 g fat, 410 mg sodium

Ruby Tuesday’s

Oops!

Turkey Burger with Fries

1,171 calories, 58 g fat

Parmesan Shrimp Penne

1,221 calories, 64 g fat

Southwestern Spring Rolls (4 rolls)

708 calories, 40 g fat

Broccoli & Cheese Soup

443 calories, 34 g fat

Smart options but..

7 oz Top Sirloin w/Baby Green Beans & Baby Portabella Mushrooms

464 calories, 24 g fat

Creole Catch w/Couscous w/Baby Green Beans

580 calories, 26 g fat

Asian Dumplings (4 dumplings)

440 calories, 20 g fat

White Bean Chicken Chili w/Tomato & Mozzarella Salad

370 calories, 15 g fat

Taco Bell

Oops!

Baja Beef Chalupa

410 calories, 27 g fat, 780 mg sodium

Zesty Chicken BORDER BOWL

640 calories, 35 g fat, 1,800 mg sodium

Grilled Stuff Chicken Burrito

640 calories, 23 g fat, 2,160 mg sodium

Caramel Apple Empanadas

290 calories, 14 g fat, 300 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Two Grilled Steak Soft Tacos, Fresco Style

320 calories, 9 g fat, 1,100 mg sodium

Chicken Fiesta Taco Salad w/out Shell

470 calories, 24 g fat, 1,780 mg sodium

Two Spicy Chicken Soft Tacos

340 calories, 12 g fat, 1,160 mg sodium

Cinnamon Twists

170 calories, 7 g fat, 200 mg sodium

Sonic

Oops!

Chicken Club Toaster Sandwich

690 calories, 35 g fat, 1,900 mg sodium

Jumbo Popcorn Chicken Salad

490 calories, 28 g fat, 1,440 mg sodium

Fish Sandwich

640 calories, 31 g fat, 1,1180 mg sodium

Large Hi-C Fruit Punch

290 calories, 0 g fat

Smart options but…

Sonic Burger with Mustard

540 calories, 25 g fat, 730 mg sodium

Grilled Chicken on Ciabatta w/BBQ Sauce

375 calories, 9 g fat, 1,310 mg sodium

Grilled Chicken Wrap

380 calories, 11 g fat, 1,300 mg sodium

Junior Banana Split

200 calories, 4.5 g fat

Wendy’s

Oops!

Roasted Turkey & Swiss Frescata w/Med Fries & Med Coke

1,100 calories, 40 g fat, 1,950 mg sodium

Chicken Club Sandwich

610 calories, 31 g fat, 1,460 mg sodium

2 Junior Cheeseburgers

720 calories, 32 g fat, 1,720 mg sodium

Medium French Fries

420 calories, 20 g fat, 430 mg sodium

Smart options but…

Ultimate Chicken Grill Sandwich w/Side Salad w/Red fat Ranch & Med Iced Tea

540 calories, 22 g fat, 1,780 mg sodium

Small Chili & 5 piece Crispy Chicken Nuggets

450 calories, 21 g fat, 1,300 mg sodium

Single w/ Everything

430 calories, 20 g fat, 900 mg sodium

Sour Cream & Chives Potato

320 calories, 4 g fat, 55 mg sodium

http://investmentwatchblog.com/restaurant-recovery-fizzles-76-percent-of-people-are-cautious-about-spending-and-they-are-eating-out-less-often/

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

 

Dealing with the Picky Eater – The Battle Between Parents and Children

picky girl

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Winning the war on what the child should eat or not eat is a continuing issue in every family in every generation.  Strategies such as, “You’ll sit here until you finish every bite on your plate” and “What do you want to eat – whatever you want, darling,” have not proven effective in ensuring that children eat healthier.

These strategies may help you survive the battle.

  1. Avoid the power struggle.  Don’t say, “Do it, because I’m the parent.”  The child needs to understand the why behind the rules, which may help lay the groundwork for lifelong, sound food choices.
  2. Let children participate in the meal preparation.
  3. Children under five are selective eaters.  That’s a fact.
  4. Introduce new foods slowly. Studies have shown children need to be exposed to a new food 10 to 15 times before they will accept it. Limit exposure to one or two new foods a week. When introducing a new food, serve it alongside familiar foods your child likes.
  5. Never use food as a reward.  Rather than using food as a reward, use something physical and fun – such as a trip to the park or a game of catch or basketball.
  6. Beware of over-snacking.  Knowing how many calories your child needs to eat and keeping track of those calories periodically can help ensure they are getting enough calories, but not too many. (See “How Many Calories Should Your Child Eat Each Day?”)
  7. Don’t label foods as “good” or “bad.”  Tie certain foods with things the child might care about , such as, lean protein helps build muscles and bones, whole grains energize sports performance, and antioxidants in fruits and vegetables help keep skin radiant and hair shiny and healthy.
  8. Be a good role model.  If you don’t eat fruits and vegetables, how can you expect the children to do so?  Your mealtime attitudes have a strong influence on your child’s eating behavior.
  9. Keep healthy foods available and accessible.  Your child can only choose foods that you purchase and bring into your home. Keep a low shelf in the refrigerator stocked with cut-up fresh fruit and other healthy food choices.
  10. Be more creative in your food design and preparation.If a child won’t drink milk, add it to oatmeal, pudding or mashed potatoes.  If a child won’t eat vegetables, serve fresh vegetables with low-fat dressing or puree the vegetables and add them to main dishes or side dishes. Don’t give up.
  11. Give your children small portions.  Children don’t need to eat the same portion sizes as adults.  Too much food can be overwhelming; they can always take seconds.
  12. Make sure the food looks and tastes good.
  13. Some children have food jags.  They will only eat certain foods.  Fortunately, children can thrive on a boring diet.
  14. If your child definitely won’t eat vegetables then boost their vitamin and mineral intake by serving more nutrient-dense fruits such as cantaloupes, berries, red or purple grapes, raisins, kiwi and oranges.
  15. If your child won’t eat meatyou can also puree the meat and add it to sauces.  You can also add gravy to meat, serve it with ketchup or mix it into mashed potatoes. A healthy diet doesn’t have to include meat but needs to include enough dairy products, beans and legumes or soy-based products, which can provide adequate amounts of protein, iron and B vitamins.

Image from: www.babble.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

Nutrition 101 for Seniors

seniors shopping healthy

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Macronutrients

The fact is less active seniors need less calories or they may end up gaining weight as they age. Even though less calories are needed as we age, you need just as many nutrients. Therefore, choosing nutrient dense foods over calorie dense foods are warranted. For example, choosing skim milk over whole milk; choosing reduced fat cheese over full fat cheese; baking, grilling, or broiling meats rather than frying with lots of fat. Seniors should choose small portions of foods high in fat, sugar and sodium. Using spices to help flavor foods may be helpful since smell and taste are affected as we age. Protein needs don’t change as we age but some seniors tend to eat less meat. Choosing foods that are higher in dietary fiber will help prevent constipation. Beans are high in dietary fiber but also contain protein and lots of nutrients such as folate, manganese, potassium, iron, copper and magnesium. But when you eat more dietary fiber, you need to make sure you drink enough fluids as well. Adequate fluid intake for seniors is essential! The number one problem that typically sends seniors to the emergency room is dehydration. Water, juice, milk, coffee and tea contain fluids. In addition, high fluid foods like melons, berries, and grapes offer dietary fiber and also lots of nutrients.

Micronutrients

As we age, it is important that we eat more calcium to help prevent osteoporosis.  Including 2 to 4 servings of dairy products like vitamin D enriched milk, yogurt or cheese each day. If you can’t tolerate these foods, check with your doctor about appropriate nutritional supplements. Make sure these supplements contain a source of Vitamin D as well. Other nutrients that are important as we age are: iron, vitamin C, and zinc.  Iron and zinc are found in meats, eggs and seafood. Vitamin C rich foods include: citrus fruits, green and red peppers, broccoli, tomatoes, strawberries and potatoes.

Problems Facing Seniors

Eating alone can affect the amount and type of food you eat.  Loss of teeth or improper fitting dentures may affect your eating style as well. Affordable food is also an issue if you are on a fixed income. Drug therapy can also affect your taste & your appetite. Depression can either decrease your food intake or increase your intake. Gas and heartburn become an issue as we get older. Overeating, avoiding fatty foods, alcohol & carbonated beverages may help to relieve heartburn problems. In addition, eating slowly, chewing food thoroughly, & eating smaller more frequent meals may help.

Senior Nutritional Tip Sheet

  • Eat breakfast every day.
  • Drink plenty of water or water based fluids & high fluid foods.
  • Select high fiber foods like whole grain breads & cereals, beans, & brightly colored fruits and vegetables.
  • If poor appetite is a problem, eating smaller more frequent mini-meals may be helpful.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

Super Sports Foods: Do They Really Need to be Exotic?

clark super foods

By Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD

 Do you ever get tired of reading yet-another headline about The 10 Best Super Sports Foods, only be instructed to buy exotic fruits, ancient grains, and other unusual items? Do we really need chia, spelt, and quinoa? Is anything wrong with old-fashioned peanut butter, broccoli and brown rice? Doubtful! Powerful nutrients are found in standard foods that are readily available at a reasonable cost. You know, oranges, bananas, berries, oatmeal, almonds, hummus, lowfat yogurt, brown rice, tuna … the basic, wholesome foods recommended by the government’s My Plate (www.ChooseMyPlate.gov). Are those foods exotic? No. But do they still do a great job of offering super nutrition? Yes!

To add to the confusion about exotic sports foods, the sports food industry touts their list of engineered super sports supplements. Ads lead you to believe you really need to buy these products to support your athletic performance. The question arises: Are there really special nutrients or components of food that can help athletes to go faster, higher or stronger? If so, can they be consumed in the form of whole foods or do we actually need special commercial supplements?

At a 2014 meeting of Professionals in Nutrition for Exercise and Sport (PINESNutrition.org), exercise researchers from around the globe discussed that topic and provided the following answers to the following thought-provoking questions.

 

Is there any difference between consuming pre-exercise caffeine in the form of pills, gels or coffee?

Regardless of the source of caffeine (pill, gel, coffee), it is a popular way to enhance athletic performance. Take note: High doses of caffeine (2.5 to 4 mg/lb body weight; 6 to 9 mg/kg) are no better than the amount athletes typically consume in a cup or two of coffee (1.5 mg/lb; 3 mg/kg). Hence, drinking an extra cup of coffee is unlikely to be advantageous, particularly when consumed later in the day before an afternoon workout and ends up interfering with sleep.

 

Do tart (Montmorency) cherries offer any benefits to sports performance? If so, what’s the best way to consume them?

Tart cherries (and many other deeply colored fruits and veggies) are rich in health-protective antioxidants and polyphenols. Tart cherries can reduce inflammation, enhance post-exercise recovery, repair muscles, reduce muscle soreness, and improve sleep. Athletes who are training hard, participating in tournaments, or traveling through time zones might be wise to enjoy generous portions. Yet, to get the recommended dose of cherries that researchers use to elicit benefits, you would need to eat 90 to 110 cherries twice a day for seven days pre-event. Most athletes prefer to swig a shot of tart cherry juice concentrate instead!

 

What about food polyphenols such as quercetin and resveratrol?

Polyphenols are colorful plant compounds that are linked with good health when they are consumed in whole foods. Yet, polyphenol supplements, such as quercetin or resveratrol, do not offer the same positive anti-oxidant or anti-inflammatory benefits. An explanation might be that once in the colon, where most polyphenols go, parts leak into the bloodstream during heavy exercise. These smaller compounds create the anti-inflammatory effect. Athletes who routinely eat colorful fruits during endurance training offer their gut the opportunity to distribute good health!

 

Does curcumin reduce chronic inflammation?

Curcumin (an active constituent of tumeric, the spice that gives the yellow color to curry and mustard) has beneficial properties that have been shown to help prevent cancer, enhance eye health, and reduce inflammation. Subjects with osteoarthritis (an inflammatory condition) who took curcumin supplements for 8 months reported less pain (due to less inflammation) and better quality of life. Unfortunately, curcumin is rapidly metabolized and therefore has low bioavailability when consumed in the diet. To increase absorption, supplements often contain curcumin combined with piperine (black pepper extract).

 

Does green tea help improve body composition in athletes? What is the best way to take it?

Green tea reportedly enhances fat oxidation and helps with weight loss, particularly when combined with caffeine. But the amount of additional fat burned is minimal, and the 10 to 12 cups of green tea needed to create any effect is a bit overwhelming. (Hence, most studies use a green tea extract.) Because green tea has not been studied in lean athletes, we can only guess that it is unlikely to offer a significant improvement in body composition.

 

Is watermelon juice a powerful stimulant for sports performance?

Watermelon juice is a source of L-citrulline, an amino acid that contributes to production of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide helps relax the blood vessels and thus enhances blood flow so more oxygen can get transported to the working muscles. One study with athletes who consumed L-citrulline supplements reports they attained a 7% higher peak power output as compared to when they exercised without L-citrulline.

Yet, when athletes were given watermelon juice (contains L-citrulline) or apple juice (that has no L-citrulline), the peak power was only slightly higher and the L-citrulline gave no significant benefits. The bottom line: Watermelon is a nourishing fruit and a welcome refreshment for thirsty athletes. You would need to eat a lot of watermelon to get the equivalent of L-citrulline found in (expensive) supplements. Your best bet is to enjoy watermelon in standard portions as a tasty addition to your sports diet.

 

What can be done with pea, hemp, or other plant protein to make them as effective as whey for building muscle?

In general, plants (such as peas, hemp) contain less leucine than found in animal proteins. Leucine helps drive the muscle’s ability to make new protein. Hence, to increase the muscle-building properties of plant proteins, you need to either eat large portions of, let’s say, hemp or pea protein (to get a bigger dose of leucine), or you can combine those plant-foods with leucine-rich proteins, such as soy, egg, or dairy foods.

 

The bottom line: Your best bet to optimize performance is to optimize your total sports diet. No amount of any supplement will compensate for lousy eating, though a few just might enhance a proper diet.

Boston-area sports nutritionist Nancy Clark, MS, RD counsels both casual and competitive athletes. Her private practice is in Newton, MA (617-795-1875). For information about her Sports Nutrition Guidebook (new 5th edition) and food guides for runners, cyclists and soccer players, see www.nancyclarkrd.com. For online education, also see www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com.

 

 

 

Grilled Cedar-Planked Salmon

cedar plank salmon

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

My favorite fish is salmon & I especially like it cooked on a cedar plank. I usually eat the cedar plank salmon at a restaurant but here’s a really great recipe you can make at home!

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  208 calories, 23 grams protein, 11 grams of fat,   grams of CHO, <1 grams dietary fiber,  270 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 10 minutes  Plank Soak Time: at least 4 hours 

Serves:  8 four-ounce servings

Ingredients

  • 1 untreated cedar plank (14 X 7 X 1 inch)*
  • ½ cup Kraft Sun Dried Tomato Vinaigrette Dressing
  • ¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • ¼ cup finely chopped oil-packed sun dried tomatoes
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 2 lb salmon fillet 1 inch thick (red snapper, orange roughy)

 

Instructions

Put plank in water & make sure it is completely submerged & soak for at least 4 hours or you can soak overnight. Mix dressing, parsley, & tomatoes.  Brush the plank with oil, then top with salmon.  Put plank on medium heat grill.  Grill for 20 minutes or until the fish easily flakes with a fork. After 10 minutes of grilling salmon, add the dressing mixture to top the salmon.

 

Shopping List

  • 1 untreated cedar plank (14 X 7 X 1 inch)
  • Kraft Sun Dried Tomato Vinaigrette Dressing
  • fresh parsley
  • oil-packed sun dried tomatoes
  • vegetable oil
  • 2 lb salmon fillet 1 inch thick

*You can grill on a sheet of heavy-duty foil instead.

Adapted from: www.Kraft.com

Image from: www.tammysrecipes.com

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

No-Bake Pumpkin Pudding Cheesecake

Double_Layer_Pumpkin_Pie

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s an easy no-bake pumpkin cheesecake recipe for the holidays. But pumpkin shouldn’t just be for Thanksgiving. Pumpkin is high in vitamin A and C plus it’s has some dietary fiber as well.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:   226 calories,  3 grams protein,  8 grams of fat,  37 grams of CHO,  2 grams dietary fiber,  393 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 15 minutes   Chill Time: 3 hours

Serves:  12

Ingredients

  • 4-oz  reduced-fat cream cheese, softened
  • 1 tbsp skim milk
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 ½ cups reduced-fat whipping topping
  • 9-inch prepared graham cracker crust
  • 1 cup COLD skim milk
  • 2 – 3 oz pkgs vanilla flavor instant pudding & pie filling
  • 16-oz can solid pumpkin
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp ground ginger
  • ¼ tsp ground cloves

Instructions

Mix softened cream cheese, 1 tbsp milk, & sugar in a large bowl with a wire whisk until smooth. Gently  stir in whipped topping. Spread on the bottom of prepared crust. Pour 1 cup skim milk in a bowl. Add pudding mixes & spread over cream cheese layer. Stir in pumpkin & spices, and spread over cream cheese layer. Refrigerate at least 3 hours or until set.

Shopping List

  • 4-oz  reduced-fat cream cheese
  • skim milk
  • reduced-fat whipping topping
  • 9-inch prepared graham cracker crust
  • 2 – 3 oz pkgs vanilla flavor instant pudding & pie filling
  • 16-oz can solid pumpkin
  • cinnamon
  • ground ginger
  • ground cloves

Adapted from Year-Round low-Fat & no-Fat Holiday Meals in Minutes by M.J. Smith, R.D. 1995.

Image from: asweettasteofhome.com/pies_and_brownies

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

 

 

 

Black Beanie Minestrone

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

This recipe has it all.  It’s high in protein, high in vitamins and minerals, has lots of phytochemicals, and it’s high in dietary fiber. You can serve this with homemade cornbread to round out the meal.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  341 calories, 13 grams protein, 16 grams of fat, 39 grams of CHO, 11 grams dietary fiber,  610 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 

Serves:  6

Ingredients

  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large onion, diced
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled & diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 cup canned black beans, rinsed & drained
  • 1 cup canned light or dark kidney beans, rinsed & drained
  • 1 cup canned Great Northern beans, rinsed & drained
  • 8 cups of water
  • 1 cup Yukon Gold potatoes, diced
  • 2 medium zucchini, diced
  • 2 medium red tomatoes, diced or 1 cup canned diced tomatoes
  • 4 cups baby spinach, fresh or 2 cups frozen, thawed
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 6 tsp olive oil for drizzling on top
  • 6 tbsp Parmigiano-Reggiano, freshly grated

Instructions

In a large pot over medium heat, sauté oil and onions until they are tender about 10 minutes. Add carrots and cook for about 3 minutes. Add celery, beans, & water and cook for about 20 minutes.  Add diced potatoes & zucchini & cook for another 20 minutes. Add tomatoes & juices & cover and simmer for additional 30 minutes. Add spinach and pepper and cook for additional 3 minutes. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil over each serving with some grated Parmigiano-Reggiano.

Shopping List

  • olive oil
  • 1 large onion
  • 2 medium carrots
  • celery stalk
  • black beans
  • light or dark kidney beans
  • Great Northern beans
  • Yukon Gold potatoes or red skinned potatoes
  • 2 medium zucchini
  • 2 medium red tomatoes
  • baby spinach, fresh or frozen
  • Fresh Parmigiano-Reggiano

Image from: tamalapaku.blogspot.com/2011/06/minestrone-soup.html

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

Eat your Beans!

By Nancy Clark MS RD CSSD

Remember this jingle: “Beans, beans, the musical fruit. The more you eat, the more you toot”? The embarrassment associated with tooting explains why many athletes shy away from beans (pinto, kidney, black) and also legumes (lentils, peanuts, soy, chick peas). But far more than being a musical fruit, beans can be a nutrient-rich bonus for a sports diet.

To my dismay, the popular but faddish Paleo diet advises against eating beans because:

1) they need to be cooked to be edible (the cavemen ate only raw foods),

2) they contain compounds that might influence your hormones (that is, if you were to eat them in super-human amounts), and

3) they contain phytates that can diminish the absorption of certain nutrients (insignificant in US diets where beans are not the primary food).

In this era of over-abundant processed foods, I contend that eating cooked beans enhances intake of a variety of important vitamins and minerals for athletes. But before I offer reasons why you should include beans in your sports diet, here are tips to minimize the “toots” so you’ll want to even entertain this suggestion.

 

Beans and gas

The average adult produces one to three pints of gas per day which is passed through the anus 14 to 23 times each day. Beans can be gas-producing because they contain raffinose, a type of carbohydrate. Humans do not possess the enzyme needed to digest raffinose, so it passes undigested through the stomach and upper intestine. In the lower intestine, it gets fermented by gas-producing bacteria which do possess the necessary enzyme. The by-product of raffinose digestion is carbon dioxide and methane (odorless) but also hydrogen sulphide (stinky). To help you blow fewer “bombs”—

1. Gradually introduce beans into your diet so your body gets used to digesting them. The jingle should actually say, “the more often you eat beans, the less likely you will toot.”

2. Drain the liquid from canned beans and rinse them well. This will decrease the amount of gas-producing carbs.

3. Try Beano, a product with the digestive enzyme that breaks down raffinose; it may help some people.

 

Nine reasons why you want to eat more beans

Beans are a positive addition to a sports diet. Here’s why.

1.Beans are a natural protein-carbohydrate combination. As an athlete, you need carbs to fuel your muscles and protein to build and repair your muscles. A bean burrito, hummus wrap, or bowl of chili is a great way to fuel-up or refuel from a hard workout (if you don’t get gas propelled, that is).

2. Beans are a good source of plant protein—but take note: you do need to consume generous portions of beans if you are a vegetarian. Athletes need at least 10 grams per meal to trigger muscular growth, and most athletes need at least 60 to 90 grams of protein per day. Half a can of refried beans offers only 10 to 12 grams of protein, the amount of protein in 1.5 eggs or a few bites of chicken. One spoonful (1/4 cup) of garbanzos on a salad offers only three grams of protein.

3. Beans have a low glycemic index, which means they are slow to digest and offer sustained energy. Low GI foods are good choices before endurance exercise if you cannot eat anything during the workout.

4. Beans are rich in vitamins and minerals, such as folate, manganese, potassium, iron, copper and magnesium. All these “spark plugs” help your body’s engine run smoothly.

5. Beans are good for heart-health. (Remember this jingle: “Beans, beans are good for your heart. The more you eat, the more you ___.”?) Yes, the soluble fiber in beans helps protect against heart disease by lowering the cholesterol in your blood. Also, beans are naturally low in fat and dietary cholesterol, so replacing meats with beans is a heart-healthy swap.

6. Beans are high in fiber (7 to 8 grams fiber per half-cup). This sharply contrasts to the chicken or meat they replace that has no fiber. This fiber acts as a “broom” and assists with regular bowel movements. Snacking on hummus with baby carrots contributes 8 to 10 grams of fiber towards the recommended daily target of 25 to 35 g.

7. Beans are inexpensive. By enjoying bean-based meals such as chili or lentil soup, you are likely eating less animal protein and saving a lot of money.

8. Bean-based meals are better for the environment than meat-based meals. If everyone were to eat one less meat-meal a week, we’d need fewer beef cattle (major producers of greenhouse gasses) and this could assist in the war against global warming.

9. Beans are good sources of fuel for the harmless, health promoting bacteria that live in your gut. We each have about 2 to 4 pounds of gut bacteria that strongly influence our immune system. In fact, about 70% of our immune response is generated from the gut. The bacteria love to eat the undigested raffinose provided by beans (and other vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts, and asparagus). Having well-nourished gut microbes invests in overall good health. A strong intake of prebiotics (bacteria food) helps strengthen the immune system and optimizes wellness. In contrast, antibiotics kill the good bacteria along with the bad bacteria.

Easy ways to boost your bean intake

Here are a few ways to easily add more beans and legumes to your sports diet.

• Hummus–A tasty dip with carrot sticks, or an alternative to mayonnaise on a turkey sandwich.

• Refried beans–canned vegetarian refried beans are fat-free. Heat some beans in a microwave oven, spread them on a tortilla, spoon on some cottage cheese and salsa, and then wrap it up like a burrito. Voila: a tasty breakfast, lunch, snack or dinner that fits into a meager food budget.

• Chili with beans–make a potful and enjoy planned-overs for lunch or dinner that week.

• Salads–spoon on black, white, or red beans and you’ll have a super sports salad that offers carbs to fuel and protein to build muscles.

• Soups–minestrone, lentil, black bean, and split pea soups make hearty, wholesome meals, You can also add beans to almost any soup to add substance and nutrients.

• Baked beans—served on toast (a popular breakfast item in England). A small can of baked beans can also be a filling snack.

• Pasta–toss a can of pinto or white beans into spaghetti sauce. Serve over pasta shells (they “catch” the beans).

Beans? No thanks!

Some athletes get terrible intestinal distress when they eat beans (and likely some other foods as well. Think onions, garlic, and wheat).  The poorly digested fiber/carbohydrate in these foods become a feast for gut bacteria. When microbes eat these undigested carbs, they create gas bombs. In some people, this fiber causes diarrhea too. Not fun.

If you fall into this category of avid bean avoiders and want to learn more, you may want to read The Complete Idiot’s Guide to IBS by Kate Scarlata, RD (www.katescarlata.com).

Image from: privateeyehealth.com/foods-rich-in-fiber-beans/

Nancy Clark, MS, RD CSSD (Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics) counsels active people at her private practice in Newton, MA (617-795-1875). For more information, read her Sports Nutrition Guidebook and food guides for marathoners, soccer players, and cyclists. They are available at www.nancyclarkrd.com. Also see www.sportsnutritionworkshop.com for online CEUs.

 

 

Fish with Veggies in a Packet

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s an easy recipe that requires very little clean-up. Plus the whole meal is in the packet.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  284 calories,  28 grams protein, 3 grams of fat,  36 grams of CHO, 5 grams dietary fiber,  475 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 15 minutes  Cook Time: 30 minutes

Serves:  4

Ingredients

  • Cooking Spray
  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried dillweed
  • 4 small baking potatoes, sliced thin
  • 1 cups thinly sliced onions (about 2 medium)
  • 2 cups thinly sliced zucchini
  • 1 cup of thinly sliced carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 4 (4-ounce) halibut fillets (or any other firm white fish) 

Instructions

Coat one side of 4 (18-inch) squares of heavy-duty aluminum with cooking spray.  Combine lemon pepper, salt, and dillweed mixing well. Arrange ¼ of the sliced potatoes in center of each foil. Sprinkle potatoes with 1/8 of seasoning in each packet. Place ¼ of the onions & zucchini on top of the potatoes. Sprinkle with 1/8 of the seasoning. Add ¼ of the carrots & sprinkle with rest of the seasoning.  Place fish over all the vegetables. Crimp edges to seal the wrap. Put each foil packet on a baking sheet. Bake at 450 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes or until the fish flakes when tested with a fork. Clean up made easy!

Shopping List

  • Cooking Spray
  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried dillweed
  • 4 small baking potatoes, sliced thin
  • 1 cups thinly sliced onions (about 2 medium)
  • 2 cups thinly sliced zucchini
  • 1 cup of thinly sliced carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 4 (4-ounce) halibut fillets (or any other firm white fish)

 Image from: www.mealplanningmoms.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.