Kentuckiana Active Lifestyle Clubs

Clubs Website

Kentuckiana Single Hikers & Walkers                               www.kishaw.org

Louisville Hiking Club                                                            www.louisvillehikingclub.org

Swim Louisville Masters                                                         www.swimlouisville.com

Cherokee Road Runners                                                         www.cherokeeroadrunners

Iroquois Hill Runners                                                              www.iroquoishillrunners.org

Louisville Rowing Club                                                          www.louisvillerowingclub.org

Louisville Landsharks Triathlon Club                             www.louisville-landsharks.com

Louisville Bicycle Club                                                           www.louisvillebicycleclub.org

Ultimate Frisbee                                                                      www.louisvilleultimate.org

Southern Indiana Wheelmen                                              www.siwheelmen.org

Orienteering Louisville                                                           www.olou.org

Men’s Rugby Club                                                                     www.louisvillerugby.org

Women’s Rugby                                                                         www.louisvillewomensrugby.com

Louisville Lacrosse Club                                                         www.louisvillelacrosse.com

Louisville Fencing Center                                                       www.louisvillefencing.org

Sierra Club                                                                                     www.louisville.sierraclub.org

Viking Canoe Club                                                                      www.vikingcanoeclub.org

Louisville Canoe & Kayak Club                                              www.louisvilleareacanoeandkayak.org

Louis Masterbladers In-Line Skating Club                        www.masterbladers.com

Louisville Skating Academy                                                   www.skatelouisville.org

Louisville Square Dancing                                                        www.squaredanceky.com

Louisville Ballroom Dancing                                                   www.louisvilleballroom.org

Derby City Athletic Club                                                           www.derbycityac.com

Louisville Ski Club                                                                       www.louisvilleskiclub.org

Runners on a Mission (ROAM)                                              www.roaminlouisville.com

 

To add a club, send the name of the club and the club website information to info@KentuckianaHEALHwellness.com.

Image from: www.mattersofopinion.com

 

 

Pump n’ Pedal: Getting Two for the Price of One

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I’ve been going to spinning classes for about 10 years. I have to admit, I am more of a lover of aerobic exercise rather than weight training. Yes, I do weight train but I need to force myself to do it. Yeah, yeah, I know I should know better as a health professional but…I am just telling you the truth.

I typically run and bike outdoors but in the winter I like to go to spinning classes rather than bike in the cold. When I saw the class called Pump n’ Pedal on the schedule, I couldn’t wait to take the class. The class definition is: cycling with resistance training combined in one session – what more could you ask for?

The instructor, Nancy Moody, was excellent! Seeing her was like a blast from the past! About 8 years ago, Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, one of the magazines I used to publish, did a feature story on her. Nancy, a very fit and health conscious woman all of her life, found out she had colon cancer. Now, she boasts she has been cancer free for 10 years & counting. She looked great & her encouragement during the class & her music was exceptional.

Nancy brought in a cart which was loaded with an assortment of bands of all colors and hand-held weights from 5 pounds to 10 pounds. After class participants picked up their tubes and weights, we mounted our bikes & the fun began (and work). The class was 75 minutes.

After 30 minutes of spinning, we got off the bike and used exercise tubing to work the muscles in our shoulders and arms. I had a band that the level of difficulty was too high for me so I struggled.  Mental note: Bring my own tubing for the next class. Back on the bike, more spinning then back to more, then off the bike again for more resistance training with the bands. Back on the bike, more spinning then off the bike using hand held weight. We did some exercises on the bike which help to strengthen our abs but no actual crunches were part of the workout.

I always wear my heart rate monitor when I exercise. It’s very rewarding for me to hit a button and discover I burned 650 calories during the class. Yippee!

The question I have right now is Will I be able to walk or run tomorrow or Wednesday or Will I be able to even lift my arms over my head. I’ll let you know in 2 days or so, that’s when the soreness really sets in!

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.

 

 

How to Choose a Personal Trainer

Mary Glover, M.Ed., M.S

Why should personal trainers be only a luxury of the rich and famous?  Some say that they cannot afford a personal trainer yet they will splurge on the purse that is in style, an expensive dinner out, or on a piece of exercise equipment that they promise to use.  Unlike the purse that goes out of style, the instantly gratifying meal, and exercise bike that is used to hang clothing on, personal training is an investment in your health and fitness which can bring lasting benefits.

Before you splurge on the gift of personal training for yourself or for someone you care about, there are a few considerations that you should be aware of to make a sound investment. The following checklist will help you in your search for an educated, qualified, and compatible trainer who will help you to meet and to exceed your fitness goals.

Education and Certification

First and foremost, a professional trainer should have a degree in exercise science, kinesiology, exercise physiology, or a related health and fitness field.  Ideally, your trainer should also have a current certification from a nationally recognized organization.

The title “Personal Trainer” is not a guarantee that the person is qualified to lead you in a safe effective exercise program. The degrees and certifications are more than just pieces of paper. Rather, they are your assurance that your trainer has spent hours of serious preparation and did not get certified on a whim. Currently, there aren’t any national standards or minimum requirements for holding this job title. Therefore, it is best for you to choose a trainer who is certified by one of the following organizations:

 

  • American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
  • Aerobic and Fitness Association of American (AFAA)
  • American Council on Exercise (ACE)
  • National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA)

While there may be other qualified certifying bodies not listed above, these are

the most recognized and respected in the field.  These certifications require a

valid CPR card, the passing of written and practical exams, and continuing

education requirements.  These organizations also offer professional liability

insurance to their trainers. Some of the organizations even provide an

online database of trainers in your particular area.

The Right Fit

You must decide if you would prefer a male or female trainer. Is the trainer able to accommodate your schedule? The trainer should be able to communicate clearly and explain your program in an easy to understand manner. Ask yourself if this trainer is someone you could get along with. The trainer should be an individual genuinely interested in helping you to make the lifestyle changes necessary to reach your fitness goals.

Fees

Rates will vary depending on the length of sessions, location, and trainer’s experience. Some gyms offer discounts on “package” deals and even group personal training options. On average, hands-on personal training is $35 to $100 an hour depending on the market.

A Game Plan

Be cautious of a trainer who insists on a workout during the first meeting without first getting to know your goals and physical capabilities. Qualified trainers should ask you to complete a health history questionnaire, informed consent form, and require a physician’s approval to exercise. Baseline measurements to assess body fat, flexibility, cardiorespiratory endurance and muscular endurance can be utilized to prescribe the best type of exercise, equipment and level of intensity. No exercise plan is complete without giving proper attention to nutrition. Your trainer should have a network of professionals such as nutrition specialists, physical therapists, and physicians to refer you to in areas outside of their expertise.

Proceed With Caution

Beware of trainers who may engage in unethical practices. Be on guard and skeptical if your trainer:

  • Tries to sell dietary supplements or “ergogenic” aids.
  • Is uninsured.
  • Doesn’t have written policies on billing and cancellation procedures.
  • Is not punctual or is unavailable via telephone or email.
  • Does not practice what he/she preaches.

With the above information you are now equipped to go out and find the best trainer to best suit you. So, go ahead and splurge because you are investing in one of your greatest assets—your health and fitness!

Mary Glover is co-owner and Fitness/Personal Training Director at Time Out Fitness in Louisville, KY. She has over 15 years of experience in personal training and is ACSM and AFFA certified. To reach Mary, call 502-558-8693, e-mail at mglover@timeoutfitness.net or visitwww.timeoutfitness.net

 

Image from: www.blogphoenixnews.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walking, Jogging or Running Around Louisville

Walking, Jogging or Running Around Louisville

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

take advantage of all the really great parks we have available to us in the Louisville area and there will be more when all the parks are developed by the 21st Century Parks. You can walk, jog or run. Walking burns less calories unless you can walk fast and raise your heart rate. Jogging and running burn more calories in less time but if you have not exercised at all start walking and then walk, jog and then you can begin running. You can use the following calculator to determine how many calories you have burned walking, jogging or running. http://health.discovery.com/centers/cholesterol/activity/activity.html . There are lots of walking/running programs in the Louisville area. Stop by one of the local running stores and they can give you some information on programs in your area. You can use following calculator to determine how many calories you need each day. http://health.discovery.com/tools/calculators/basal/basal.html

 

Use a Pedometer to Count How Many Steps You Take Per Day


Pedometers can track steps, track distance, have 7-day memory or longer, track total calories. You can get a pedometer at discount stores like Target or Walmart, at sporting goods stores like Dick’s or Scheller’s or at any of the local running stores.

 

Here’s an excellent resource about pedometers:

 

http://www.new-lifestyles.com/content.php?_p_=100

 

Every 2,000 steps is equal to about 1 mile, so …

2,000 steps = 1 mile

3,000 steps = a half mile

4,000 steps = 2 miles

10,000 steps = 5 miles

 

Take the 10,000 Steps per Day Challenge.

  1. Fewer than 4,500 steps per day: You Are Very Sedentary.
  2. 4,500 – 5,500 steps per day: You Are Sedentary.
  3. 5,500 – 7,500 steps per day: You Are Moving-but still not enough.
  4. 8,500 steps per day: You Are Doing a Great             Job. Keep It Up!
  5. 10,000 steps per day: Ultimate Goal for Long Term Health & Wellness.

 

Walking & Exercise Paths in Louisville Area

 

Algonquin, Cypress & Burwell Streets (1/4 mile)

Beargrass Creek Greenway, 2001 Lexington Rd (1.33 miles)

Blue Lick Park, 4114 Mudd Lane (1/4 mile)

Butchertown Greenway, From Brownsboro Road to River Road (1/2 mile)

Camp Taylor Memorial, Poplar Level Road & Lee Street (1-mile fitness course; 1/3-mile walking path)

Cane Run Road Park, Cane Run Road south of Lees Lane (0.75 miles)

Carrie Gaulbert Cox Park, 3730 River Rd, (1 mile)

Cherokee Scenic Loop, Eastern Parkway & Cherokee Road (2.4 miles)

Cherokee Park Baringer Path, (0.6 miles)

Cherokee Park, Willow Pond, Grinstead Drive & Lexington Road (0.375 miles)

Chickasaw, Southwestern Parkway and Greenwood Avenue (1-mile fitness course)

Des Pres, Lowe Road off Taylorsville Road (1/2 mile)

Flaget Field, Greenwood Avenue & 45th Street (1/4 mile)

Hays Kennedy, Bass Road off River Road (3/4 mile)

Iroquois, Southern Parkway & New Cut Road (1-1.6-mile fitness course)

*Iroquois, Rundill Rd (3.5 miles)

Iroquois, Summit Hill (0.25 miles)

Iroquois, Toppil Rd (0.5 miles)

Iroquois, Uppill Rd (1.5 miles)

Jefferson Memorial Forest, 11311 Mitchell Hill Rd (1/4 mile)

Jefferson Memorial Forest, 11311 Mitchell Hill Rd (35 miles trails)

Joe Creason Park Loop, 1297 Trevilian Way (1.5 miles)

Joe Creason Park Newport-Illinois, 1297 Trevilian Way (0.875 miles)

Joe Creason Park Newburg Loop, 1297 Trevilian Way (0.5 miles)

Klondike, Klondike Lane (1/3 mile)

Long Run Park, 1605 Flat Rock Rd, (1.7 miles)

Ohio River Levee Trail, From Farnsley-Moreman Landing to north Riverview Park (6.5 miles)

Peterburg Park, Indian Trail west of Newburgh Road (.35 mile)

RiverWalk, starts at 4th and River Road and goes along river to Chickasaw Park (6.9 miles)

Roberson Run Park, Judge Boulevard and Famous Way (.5 mile)

*Seneca Park, Pee Wee Reese at Cannons Lane (1.2 miles)

*Shawnee Park, Broadway & Southwestern Pkwy (1.5 miles)

South Central Park, 2400 Colorado Ave  (1/3 mile)

Southern Parkway Bridle Path, Western Side (2.6 miles)

*Thurman Hutchins Park, River Road and Indian Hills Trail (0.8 mile)

Tom Sawyer State Park, 3000 Freys Hill Road (1 1/4 mile nature trail)
Tyler Park, 1501 Castlewood Ave  (1/8 mile)

Upper River Road Path. From Zorn Ave to Indian Hills Tr (1.125 miles)

Vettiner, 5550 Charlie Vettiner Park Rd (1/4-mile fitness trail)

Victory Park, 1051 South 23rd St, (1/4 mile)

Watterson Lake, 1714 South Wheatmore Dr (1/4 mile)

Wyandotte Park, 1104 Beecher Street (1/4 mile)

 

Cross-Country Trails

Creason, Trevilian Way (3.1-6.2 miles)

Seneca, Pee Wee Reese at Cannons Lane (3.1 miles)

www.metro-parks.org

 

What are the Mayor’s Miles?

Several park paths have green dots along the exercise paths to help you track your progress on the path. Ten green dots equal one Mayor’s Mile.

 

Golf Courses Cart Paths You Can Walk or Run On

According to the Metro Parks Recreation Guide, you can walk or jog on all the 18-hole Metro Parks golf courses cart paths on weekdays from 6 to 8 am.

 

Cherokee Golf Course, 2501 Alexander Rd

Crescent Hill Golf Course, 3110 Brownsboro Rd

Iroquois Golf Course, 1501 Rundill Rd

Long Run Golf Course, 1605 Flat Rock Rd

Bobby Nichols Golf Course, 4301 East Pages Lane

Seneca Golf Course, 2300 Pee Wee Reese Rd

Shawnee Golf Course, 460 Northwestern Pkwy

Sun Valley Golf Course, 6505 Bethany Ln

Charlie Vettiner Golf Course, 10207 Mary Dell Ln

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.

 

 

Sprained Ankles, Sprained Wrists, Plague Athletes But Help in on the Way!

Sprained Ankles, Sprained Wrists, Plague Athletes But Help in on the Way!

Try the Arctic Ease Cryotherapy Wraps or Pads!

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I went to pick up my race number for the Derby Festival miniMarathon Thursday.   I spent a few minutes looking the exhibits at the Expo. What I found was an interesting new product called Arctic Ease. As an athlete, I have had every injury in the book: sprained and broken ankles, sprained and broken wrists, shoulder pain, foot pain, knee pain, back pain, pulled groin muscle, you name it, I have had it. Most of the pain and swelling from these musculoskeletal injuries would have been greatly decreased at the point of impact if I had had some ice readily available. But when you are out running or riding a bike, you typically don’t carry ice with you. But Arctic Ease might be just what the doctored ordered.

What is an Arctic Ease?

Arctic Ease is a specially treated cryotherapy wrap or pad which absorbs heat energy from your body to cool the covered area and can be wrapped around the injured area. It easily conforms to the injury and requires no tape or clips. According to the product information, “the absorbed heat is then lost to evaporation, which allows for the sustained cooling effect of Arctic Ease.”   According to their product information, Arctic Ease stays cold for 4 to 6 hours. It comes in a ready-to-use right-out-of –the –pouch package.

No refrigeration is needed and the fact that it is reusable makes Arctic Ease cost effective. All you have to do is add 1 to 2 tablespoons of water and reseal the bag. It takes about 2 – 3 hours to rehydrate.

If needed, Arctic Ease can actually be worn during exercise. Arctic Ease is odorless, contains no latex or adhesive, and is also eco-friendly. It’s convenient in that you could stuff it in a runner’s belt or bike pouch, ready to use when needed. Hey, this strategy might be like taking an umbrella with you to prevent it from raining!  If you have active kids, you may want to stuff one of these wraps in your car, just in case!

You can get one 4” X 60” online at www.arcticease.com ($12.29) www.amazon.com ($16.64), www.walgreens.com ($11.49) or www.cvs.com ($12.99). The pads sell for a pack of three 4” X 6” pads ($8.79) at www.arcticease.com.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.