Fish with Veggies in a Packet

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s an easy recipe that requires very little clean-up. Plus the whole meal is in the packet.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:  284 calories,  28 grams protein, 3 grams of fat,  36 grams of CHO, 5 grams dietary fiber,  475 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 15 minutes  Cook Time: 30 minutes

Serves:  4

Ingredients

  • Cooking Spray
  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried dillweed
  • 4 small baking potatoes, sliced thin
  • 1 cups thinly sliced onions (about 2 medium)
  • 2 cups thinly sliced zucchini
  • 1 cup of thinly sliced carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 4 (4-ounce) halibut fillets (or any other firm white fish) 

Instructions

Coat one side of 4 (18-inch) squares of heavy-duty aluminum with cooking spray.  Combine lemon pepper, salt, and dillweed mixing well. Arrange ¼ of the sliced potatoes in center of each foil. Sprinkle potatoes with 1/8 of seasoning in each packet. Place ¼ of the onions & zucchini on top of the potatoes. Sprinkle with 1/8 of the seasoning. Add ¼ of the carrots & sprinkle with rest of the seasoning.  Place fish over all the vegetables. Crimp edges to seal the wrap. Put each foil packet on a baking sheet. Bake at 450 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes or until the fish flakes when tested with a fork. Clean up made easy!

Shopping List

  • Cooking Spray
  • 1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried dillweed
  • 4 small baking potatoes, sliced thin
  • 1 cups thinly sliced onions (about 2 medium)
  • 2 cups thinly sliced zucchini
  • 1 cup of thinly sliced carrot (about 2 medium)
  • 4 (4-ounce) halibut fillets (or any other firm white fish)

 Image from: www.mealplanningmoms.com

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

What does hydration have to do with senior’s health?

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I participated in a webinar sponsored by the Coca Cola Company. Ron Maughan, PhD, discussed Hydration, Health and Performance. He presented some very interesting data regarding chronic dehydration (hypohydration) in the elderly and how it affects their health status*. Dr. Maughan reported chronic dehydration in the elderly may be associated with a decline in physical function and also a decline in their cognitive status. Apparently, dehydration can be due to a reduced thirst sensation which occurs as people get older.

In addition, some drugs that seniors routinely take may also suppress their thirst.  These drug classes include: SSRI’s, ACE Inhibitors and also anti-Parkinson drugs. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) are a class of compounds typically used as antidepressants in the treatment of depressionanxiety disorders, and some personality disorders. They are also typically effective and used in treating some cases of insomnia. Many seniors routinely take anti-depressants.

Signs & Symptoms of Dehydration

Unfortunately, some of the signs and symptoms of dehydration can be identical to senile dementia symptoms, age dementia symptoms and Alzheimer’s symptoms. Correcting dehydration can allow the senior to return to a full and normal life. But, not correcting the dehydration may actually ensure the hospitalization of the senior.

The most common signs and symptoms of dehydration include persistent fatigue, lethargy, muscle weakness or cramps, headaches, dizziness, nausea, forgetfulness, confusion, deep rapid breathing, or an increased heart rate. Dehydration is a very serious condition, more than most people realize. Since seniors often have a reduced sense of thirst, dehydration is one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization after age 65.

Other less common signs and symptoms of dehydration can include:

  • Excessive loss of fluid through vomiting, urinating, stools or sweating
  • Poor intake of fluids, “can’t keep anything down”
  • Sunken eyes
  • Dry or sticky mucous membranes in the mouth
  • Skin that lacks its normal elasticity and sags back into position slowly when pinched up into a fold
  • Decreased or absent urine output
  • Decreased tears

After reviewing these symptoms, if you or your family member has any of

these symptoms, maybe dehydration is the cause of the confusion rather than a diagnosis of dementia or Alzheimer’s.

 

Dehydration Can Cause Death

According to Dr. Maughan, about 50% of elderly hospitalized with dehydration died within a year of admission. In fact, readmission rates are high due to repeated dehydration. Hospitalization of elderly with a diagnosis of dehydration is a serious and costly medical problem but preventable.

Prevention of Dehydration in Seniors

Prevention is key to helping seniors remain healthy and also will help drive down costs. Although most people get about 20% of their fluid intake from food, most seniors get about half their fluid intake from solid foods such as fruits and vegetables because seniors have a reduced sense of thirst.  In addition to a reduced sense of thirst seniors also have a reduced appetite.  Reduced thirst and reduced appetite may also be due to their medications. Proper hydration may be a challenge but one strategy that will help keep seniors healthy, alert, active and out of the hospital.

Institutionalized seniors may need between 1,700 milliliters or 56 ounces and 2,000 milliliters or 67 ounces of daily fluid**. The Institute of Medicine advises men to consume about 13 cups of fluids per day and women should consume about 9 cups per day.

Another way to determine hydration is the color of one’s urine. Urine color for the first void of the day is typically yellow but as the day goes on urine color should be pale (slightly yellow) to colorless. If not, more fluids need to be ingested.

Here’s a Urine Color Chart that you might find useful, http://www.rte.ie/tv/useitorloseit/hydration.pdf.  Check out Table 1. Water Content of Fruits & Vegetables.

Table 1. Water Content of Fruits & Vegetables

Food                                                % of Water

Apples (raw)
Applesauce (canned, sweetened)
Apricots (raw)
Apricots (canned)
Asparagus (cooked)
84%
80%
86%
78%
91%
Avocados (raw)
Bananas (raw)
Bell Peppers (raw)
Blackberries (raw)
Blueberries (raw)%
73%
74%
92%
86%
85%
Broccoli (cooked)
Broccoli (flower clusters, raw)
Cabbage (raw)
Cantaloupe (raw)
Carrots (raw)
91%
91%
92%
90%
88%
Cauliflower (raw)
Cauliflower (cooked)
Celery (raw)
Cherries (raw)
Corn (1 ear, cooked)
92%
93%
95%
81%
70%
Cucumbers (raw)
Grapefruit (pink or red, raw)
Grapes (raw)
Honeydew Melon (raw)
Kiwi fruit (raw)
96%
91%
81%
90%
83%
Lettuce (raw)
Mangoes (raw)
Nectarines (raw)
Olives (ripe, canned)
Oranges (raw)
96%
82%
86%
80%
87%
Peaches (raw)
Peaches (canned)
Pears (raw)
Pears (canned)
Plums (raw)
88%
79%
84%
80%
85%
Potato (baked)
Raspberries (raw)
Strawberries (raw)
Tangerines (raw)
Tomatoes (raw)
Watermelons (raw)
75%
87%
92%
88%
94%
92%

*Warren et al (1994). The burden and outcomes associated with dehydration among US elderly. 1991. Am J Public Health 84, 1265 – 1269.

**Chidester JC et al (1997). Fluid Intake in the institutionalized elderly. JADA, 97, 23-28.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

 

 

Avocado Cabbage Carrot Coleslaw

avocado coleslaw

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Excellent side dish with a creamy avocado-cilantro dressing.  Not low in calories but lots of nutrients, antioxidants & dietary fiber.

Nutritional Information Per Serving: 224 calories, 4 grams protein, 15 grams of fat,  24 grams of CHO,  10 grams dietary fiber,  59 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 10 minutes    

Serves:  4

Ingredients

  • 2 ripe fresh avocados, halved, seeded, diced and divided
  • ¼ cup white vinegar
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • ½ tsp ground cumin
  • 4 cups sliced green cabbage
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • ½ cup diced red onion
  • ¼ cup chopped cilantro
  • Salt & pepper to taste

 

Instructions

Place one avocado, vinegar, water, sugar and cumin in a blender. Blend on puree until smooth.  In a large bowl, combine cabbage, carrots, onion, cilantro and avocado.  Pour avocado dressing over cabbage mixture & mix well. Salt and pepper to taste.

 

Shopping List

  • 2 ripe fresh avocados
  • white vinegar
  • sugar
  • ground cumin
  • green cabbage*
  • carrots
  • red onion
  • fresh cilantro

 

*Can buy sliced cabbage to save time.

 

Recipe Adopted from www.loveonetoday.com

Image from: https://www.pinterest.com/source/paradisegroveavocados.com/

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.     

 

The SeatShield™ – Shields Your Car Seats from Sweating

seat shield

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

I am a runner and a cyclist. All of our cars have leather seats. After I exercise, I hate to get into the car & stick to the seats! If you have cloth seats, your sweat can end up making the seat smell. Or you can buy a car seat cover that can not only protect your car seat from sweat, dirt and all the odors associated with an active lifestyle but it can be thrown in the washer when it gets dirty and only used when the need arises.  I have an EliteSport™ SeatShield™ and  I keep mine folded in my car when not being used so it’s conveniently available after I’ve been working out in the spring, summer and fall.

The SeatShield™ is a high tech, multi-layered seat cover that can be slipped over your car seat in seconds and can be easily stored when not needed.  Unlike a towel, the SeatShield stays in place.  There are three different types of SeatShields: the AllSport™ UltraSport™ and the Elite Sport™.   All are made out of a tri-laminate material which contains a waterproof/breathable middle layer. The AllSport™ top layer is made of a synthetic non-woven microfiber that becomes soft with use.  The top layer for the UltraSport™ is a velour microfiber that is very soft and durable which allows the SeatShield to fit better on the leather seats. Because the UltraSport has a mesh bottom layer it works well on leather or cloth seats.  The new Elite Sport™ has the same top material as the Ultrasport but the Elite Sport™ has a special undercoating that provides a very grippy surface made especially for leather seats.  In addition, it keeps the leather seats cool in the summertime.  All the  Seat Shields have a top surface that wicks away the moisture from you so it can evaporate quickly.

 

All Seat Shields are odor-resistance containing a permanent anti-microbial treatment to kill odor causing bacteria. However, if you sweat a lot after your workouts you might want to purchase the UltraSport™ or the EliteSport™ because they remain waterproof not matter how much moisture is expelled from a heavy amount of perspiration.

 

All SeatShields fits any car with a headrest including SUV’s and trucks with a 60/40 bench.  The AllSport sells for $19.95, the UltraSport sells for $29.95 and the EliteShield™ sells for $39.95 (www.SeatShield.com or 1-888-643-8976).  The AllSport comes in only light gray  and weighs about 4 ounces.  The UltraSport and EliteSport™ comes in two colors: light gray and beige.  They weigh approximately 12 ounces.

 

Allsport Seat Shield

AllSport-260x191

Elite

EliteSport-260x209

Ultra sport

UltraSport-110x85

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

 

 

Avocado Oatmeal Breakfast Cookies*

avocado cookies

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

This recipe contains a number of healthy ingredients which make up a good tasting breakfast cookie for your family who is on the go!

Nutritional Information Per Cookie: 183 calories, 4 grams protein, 5 grams of fat,  31 grams of CHO, 4 grams dietary fiber,  255 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 15 minutes  Bake Time: 35 minutes

Serves:  24 cookies

Ingredients

  • 3 cups of old-fashioned oats
  • 1 ½ cup white whole wheat flour
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 ripe fresh avocado, pitted, peeled, mashed
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup plain low-fat yogurt
  • Salt & pepper, to taste
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups raisins, dried cranberries or pitted & chopped dates (about 12 oz)

*You can add 1 cup of chocolate chips if you must be it will increase the calories but…

Instructions

Heat oven to 375 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with aluminum foil & spray with non-stick cooking spray.  Combine oats, flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon & salt in a medium bowl. Mix.  In a large bowl, cream together oil, avocado & brown sugar.  Stir in yogurt & eggs. Mix well.  Add oat mixture to avocado mixture. Stir until oat mixture in well mixed into the avocado mixture.  Stir in dates.  Use a ¼ cup measuring cup for each cookie & space the cookies 2 inches apart on baking sheet. Bake for 18 to 22 minutes, until golden. Transfer to wire racks & cool completely.

 

Shopping List

  • old-fashioned oats
  • white whole wheat flour
  • baking powder
  • baking soda
  • cinnamon
  • salt
  • 1 ripe fresh avocado
  • brown sugar
  • olive oil
  • plain low-fat yogurt
  • large eggs

 Image from: http://www.avocadocentral.com/

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

Cyclists Should Obey the Rules of the Road

cycling

Compiled by Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Be Courteous and that recommendation goes both ways! When I am riding my bike or running, cyclists whiz past me, sometimes I hear them sometimes not but…if they shout On Your Left or On Your Right, it would benefit both them and the other person as well.  Safety should be your first concern.

Here are the Rules of the Road:

  1. Respect right of way of motorists.
  2. Obey traffic signals like from green to yellow light. Stop unless safety is a concern – wet pavement.
  3. Obey stop signs and stop lights. (My personal downfall is when riding in my own neighborhood – but am forcing myself to adhere to law. This makes motorists mad if you don’t obey the rules of the road).
  4. If riding with a group, look behind for another bike or car before changing position in a pace line.
  5. If riding with a group, if you see a pothole, a dog, or some debris on the road, let your fellow cyclists know by pointing.
  6. When over taking another cyclist or passing around a runner or walker, saying On Your Right or Car Up or Car Back to help ensure safety. As a runner, too, I can’t tell you have many times a cyclist has flown past me and one simple step from me could have caused a collision with the cyclist.  When riding on Rails-To-Trails, dogs are also a problem.  They don’t understand command like on your left so I am especially careful around dogs.
  7. In most states, riding two abreast is allowed unless in heavy traffic but sometimes the interpretation is left up to law officer’s discretion. Check your state’s policy.
  8. Cyclists should ride to the right in most cases but on a narrow road you should share the road without being run off the road for safety.
  9. When turning, using effective hand signals in a group will alert other cyclists as to your intention which can help with safety of both you and the other cyclist.
  10. Follow the GOLDEN RULE: ALWAYS KEEP YOUR COOL and remain courteous to other cyclists and motorists.

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers. Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.

Tossed Veggie Salad in a Pita Pocket

pita pockets

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

 Here’s an easy-to-fix lunch meal for home, work or school.  The pita has lots of colorful nutrient packed veggies.  You can substitute a whole grain tortilla if you want to form a wrap.

Nutrition Information Per Serving:  180 calories, 6 grams protein, 7 grams of fat, 24 grams of CHO,  4 grams of fiber,  513 mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  10 minutes

Serves:  Four – ½ stuffed pita each serving

Ingredients

  • 2 whole wheat large pita breads, cut in half*
  • 1 cup chopped romaine lettuce, spinach or a combination
  • ¼ cup peppers, red, green or yellow, chopped
  • ¼ cup cucumber, chopped
  • ¼ cup carrots, shredded
  • ¼ cup black beans, drained and rinsed or any other beans you like
  • ¼ cup low fat cheese, cheddar or mozzarella, shredded
  • ½ cup low fat salad dressing of your choice

 

Instructions

Cut pita bread in half.  Set aside.  Combine all salad ingredients in a small bowl.  Toss thoroughly.  Fill each pita pocket with salad.  Sprinkle with salad dressing.

 

Shopping List

  • 2 whole wheat pita breads
  • romaine lettuce  or spinach
  • peppers, red, green or yellow
  • cucumber
  • carrots
  • black beans
  • low fat cheese, cheddar or mozzarella, shredded
  • low fat salad dressing

 

*May substitute a whole wheat tortilla for the pita bread. You can also add fruit like grapes or switch the veggies with ones that you already have in your refrigerator.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHealthWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.    

 

 

Almond Crusted Salmon

crusted-salmon-ck-1662863-x

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Nutrition Information Per Serving: 326 calories, 29 grams protein, 16 grams of fat, 16 grams of CHO, 3 grams of fiber, 275  mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 10 minutes   Cook Time: 15 minutes

Serves: 6

Ingredients*

  • 1 cup slivered almonds, finely chopped (use food processor, it’s easier)
  • ¼ cup plain bread crumbs
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • ½ tsp Old Bay Seasoning
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • 1/3 cup egg whites, beaten or 1 large egg, beaten with 1 tbsp water
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 1 ½ pounds salmon (6 fillets)

Instructions

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Spray baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. Combine the almonds, bread crumbs, brown sugar, Old Bay seasoning, and salt in a shallow pan. Place beaten egg (or egg whites) and water in another pan and the flour in another shallow pan or plate. Season fish with additional salt and pepper (optional). Bread each fish fillet by coating both sides with flour, then dip in egg mixture then coat evenly with nut mixture. Place each fillet on the baking sheet and bake until golden brown about 15 minutes.

Shopping List

  • slivered almonds, finely chopped (use food processor, it’s easier)
  • plain bread crumbs
  • brown sugar
  • ½ tsp Old Bay Seasoning
  • large egg or egg whites
  • 1 ½ pounds salmon (6 fillets)

*Can  substitute other fish like tilapia, halibut, or whitefish.  Can also substitute pecans for almonds.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.

 

Grilled Portobello Sandwich

portobello-sandwich-large

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

Here’s a really great vegetarian sandwich with lots of anti-oxidants and tastes good, too. You can cut the calories by using a 100% whole wheat sandwich thin. Enjoy!

Per Serving: 270  calories, 9 grams protein, 10 grams of fat, 38 grams of CHO, 3 grams of fiber,  390 mg sodium.

Preparation Time:  10 minutes Cook Time: 10 minutes 

Serves:  6

 Ingredients

For the Portobello mushrooms

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh basil
  • salt to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 portobello mushrooms

For sandwiches:

  • ¾ cup cream cheese, low fat whipped, or goat cheese
  • 6 pieces of focaccia or other good quality bread, sliced in half, lengthwise
  • 1 cup spinach, or arugula leaves, washed and dried
  • 6 slices of tomato

Instructions

For the Portobello mushrooms:

Preheat the grill.  Mix the olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper, and 1 teaspoon of the basil together.  Remove the stems from the mushrooms and brush both sides of the caps with the olive oil mixture.  Set aside.  Gill the mushrooms until they are soft in the center, about 3 to 4 minutes on each side.  Slice each cap on the diagonal into 1” strips.

For the sandwiches:

Mix the cheese, the remaining teaspoon of basil, salt and pepper together.  Set aside.  Spread 6 halves of bread with the cheese mixture, then top with the spinach or arugula, a slice of tomato and several Portobello mushrooms strips.  Place the other half of the bread on top.

 

Shopping List

  • olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • fresh basil
  • 6 portobello mushrooms
  • cream cheese, low fat whipped, or goat cheese
  • 6 pieces of focaccia
  • spinach, or arugula leaves
  • tomato

Note: You can make it quicker, substitute ½ a roasted red pepper for each slice of tomato.  Make it seasonal – steps 2 through 4 can be done ahead.  The ingredients will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

 

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 11 grandchildren.    

 

Very Berry Nutty Chocolate Crisp

summer-berry-cobbler-2

By Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N.

With berries being in season right now you can substitute the frozen fruits with 5 cups of sliced fresh berries.  This recipe is high in fiber and antioxidants, with lots of flavenoids.  Plus it’s loaded with Vitamin C. But the most important ingredient: DARK CHOCOLATE. Yum!

Nutritional Information Per Serving: 368 calories, 9 grams protein, 15 grams of fat, 55 grams of CHO, 10 grams of fiber,  18 mg sodium.

Preparation Time: 10 minutes. Cook time: 40 minutes.

Serves: 8

Ingredients

2  12-ounce bags frozen unsweetened mixed berries (5 cups) which include strawberries, blackberries, raspberries and blueberries or can use berries of choice

  • 2 Tbsp. cornstarch
  • 2 Tbsp. honey
  • 1 cup old fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/3 cup wheat germ
  • 2 tbsp ground flaxseed
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts or almonds
  • 12  Dove dark chocolate pieces
  • 2 tbsp Light Cool Whip per serving or can substitute low fat vanilla yogurt\

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  In a bowl, mix berries with cornstarch and put in an 8″x8″ glass baking dish.  In a small bowl, combine the honey, rolled oats, wheat germ, brown sugar, cinnamon and nuts.  Spread over the berry mixture and bake for 30 minutes.  Remove and top evenly with chocolate broken pieces in a blender and return to oven for 10 minutes.  Serve with Cool Whip or vanilla low fat yogurt.

Shopping List

  • Frozen mixed berries or 5 cups of fresh berries
  • Cornstarch
  • Honey
  • Rolled oats
  • Wheat germ
  • Brown sugar
  • Cinnamon
  • Walnuts
  • Dove dark chocolate pieces
  • Light Cool Whip

Barbara Day, M.S., R.D., C.N., is a registered dietitian with a Master’s Degree in clinical nutrition.  The former publisher of Kentuckiana HealthFitness Magazine, Kentuckiana Healthy Woman magazine and radio show host of Health News You Can Use, Barbara has over 30 years of experience in promoting healthy lifestyles to consumers.  Barbara worked as Nutrition Consultant to the Navy SEALs (8 years) and the University of Louisville Athletic Department (10 years). Barbara has private practice, DayByDay Nutrition, www.DayByDayNutrition.com, where she counsels clients on weight loss, cholesterol management, performance nutrition and an array of other medical issues.  Visit Barbara’s new website which is an on-line health & wellness magazine, www.KentuckianaHEALTHWellness.com. Barbara writes nutrition and health columns for www.LiveStrong.com as well as a weekly nutrition column for the Southeast Outlook. She also designs and presents employee wellness programs to small and large businesses. Barbara is a runner, cyclist, hiker and a mother and grandmother to 13 grandchildren.